American Sports Builders Association


American Sports Builders Association
July 2007


July 2007

Welcome to the latest innovation from ASBA - NEWSLINE on-line!

From the Chair
Gerry Wright, CTCB
IIt would seem that the objectives of politics and science shouldn’t be mutually exclusive; i.e., if scientific research shows that certain practices lead to certain negative results to our well being, one might assume that there would be a political motivation to counter those practices for the public good. But you know what they say about “ASSUMING”!

As I write this, President is in Germany for the G-8 Summit. He appears to be a lone fish swimming upriver with regards to one of the critical agenda items - global warming. The world looks to the U.S. to take a leadership position in addressing this issue, an opportunity we have yet to seize. But on the local and national levels, “green” design and construction methods are gaining momentum. These ideas and techniques strive to make better use of our natural resources and reduce the amount of waste introduced to the environment. It is becoming clear that this not only makes good sense, but good business too. Read more...

Meetings
TM2007
In case you haven’t guessed yet, it’s the American Sports Builders Association’s Technical Meeting, to be held December 1-3 at the Hyatt Regency in Austin, Texas. The meeting includes the elements that you’ve come to know and love, including state-of-the-art technical sessions, a trade show full of products and services to help you work better and smarter, awards honoring the industry’s best and brightest, and tennis and golf tournaments to help make the most of friendly competition. Read more...

 

 

Featured Articles

TradelineWorksite Safety – Part One
Surely it’s no coincidence that trade magazines are full of articles on safety. From SportsField Management to Grading and Excavation; from American Track & Field to Turf, publications are focusing on this important topic. Read more...

OpinionlineConcrete Tennis Court Mix Designs
When building concrete courts, you should carefully consider mix designs for the concrete. In each part of the country, there are different materials being used in the mixture of concrete, the foremost being different types of aggregate. These different types of aggregate can and will affect acrylic tennis court surfacing. Read more...

 

 

ASBA News
Committees
Again this spring, volunteers – this time Sam Fisher, CTB (Fisher Tracks, Inc., Boone, IA), Robert Cohen, CTB (Robert Cohen Co., LLC, Albuquerque, NM), John Schedler, CTB (FieldTurf Tarkett, Highlands Ranch, CO, Kristoff Eldridge, CTB (Cape & Island Tennis & Track, Pocasset, MA) and Jon Renner, CTB (Line Design, Inc., Littleton, CO), together with ASBA Executive Vice President Carol Hogan - met with governing body representatives P. Duffy Mahoney of USATF, Heather Perry of NCAA and Becky Oakes of NFHS to discuss track rules and the impact on construction. Read more...

On the Web
Better Leads System; Sign Up Now
You asked for it; you got it – a better leads system. In case you missed it, you now can tell us what kind of leads you want and they will be delivered direct to you via e-mail.

Log in to the Members Only section of the website with the general member log in. Click on “Update Member Listing.” Log in with your unique user name and password. If you have forgotten your unique login, click “Forgot Password” and it will be sent to you. Once you log in, you can reset or change your password.

At the bottom of your listing, add the e-mail to which leads should be sent, as well as the types of leads and the states for which you want them. Leads meeting the criteria you set will be e-mailed to you.

Fine Tune Your Profile for Better Website Search
Help potential customers find you by updating your website profile. Customers use the searchable database to find products and providers. . .but only if your record helps them find you. Owners and end-users can search by company name or by category. But most often they search by keyword. A list of suggested keywords is provided for their consideration; however, in a world dominated by Google, most users are used to free form entry searching. If the words or word-string they enter does not appear in your listing, they won’t find you. So give some thought to exactly what your listing says. If you want customers looking for “acrylic coatings,” “tennis surfaces” and “hard courts” to find you, all of those words must be included. You can edit your listing online, using the instructions listed above. Your profile is found in the company information field. Scroll down past your company name and address to access it.

Obituary
Alan Rossi (Vermont Tennis Court Surfacing, St. Johnsbury, VT) died unexpectedly on April 21, 2007. Prior to entering the sports surfacing business, Rossi attended Springfield College and earned a degree in biology. He worked as a biology/physiology teacher at St. Johnsbury Academy and coached baseball and JV basketball. Rossi also served as a member of the Ski Patrol at Stowe and as Alpine ski instructor and race coach for his daughter Angela. Rossi was the brother-in-law of ASBA Tennis Division President Gordy Pierce, CTCB (Cape & Island Tennis and Track, Pocasset, MA).

 

Member News

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Calendar of Events
Important Dates
Mark your calendar for the ASBA Technical Meeting in Austin, TX. Read more...

 

 

 

 

FYI
Battle of the Surfaces
In an interesting lead up to Roland Garros and Wimbledon, Number Two Rafael Nadal edged out Number One Roger Federer during a so-called “Battle of the Surfaces,” an exhibition in Mallorca in May. Read more...

Are Your High Performers Ready to Quit?
According to a study of 16,237 employees on workforce and retention issues conducted by Leadership IQ, 47% of high performers are actively looking for other jobs... Read more...

Pro Football Players Still Prefer Grass
Despite the astounding growth of synthetic turf in the sports field marketplace, the 2007 survey of National Football League players still indicates that they prefer grass. Read more...

3-Point Rule
According to the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the new three-point line will be at 20 feet, 9 inches for men. Read more...

American Track & Field Offers Service to ASBA Members
Thinking about advertising in American Track & Field magazine to tie in to ASBA’s articles (see box below)? Read more...

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From the Chair
It would seem that the objectives of politics and science shouldn’t be mutually exclusive; i.e., if scientific research shows that certain practices lead to certain negative results to our well being, one might assume that there would be a political motivation to counter those practices for the public good. But you know what they say about “ASSUMING”!

As I write this, President is in Germany for the G-8 Summit. He appears to be a lone fish swimming upriver with regards to one of the critical agenda items - global warming. The world looks to the U.S. to take a leadership position in addressing this issue, an opportunity we have yet to seize. But on the local and national levels, “green” design and construction methods are gaining momentum. These ideas and techniques strive to make better use of our natural resources and reduce the amount of waste introduced to the environment. It is becoming clear that this not only makes good sense, but good business too.

Recently, Marvin Malecha, the Dean of the N.C. State University School of Design (one of the land’s finer institutions, I may say), was elected President of the American Institute of Architects. His mission is to lead the charge for reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 50% through smarter, greener design.

One of my favorite shows over the years has been “This Old House.” I’ve always enjoyed the challenge of preserving the architectural character of older buildings, while blending in modern design techniques and improved construction methods and materials. An offshoot of this program, the This Old House Magazine has taken a major step by espousing “green” construction in its publication.

Does the sports surfacing industry practice, or even preach, about green construction? Does the ASBA? I am happy to say that our Professionals Division has begun to preach these concepts through sessions at our Technical Meetings and presentations to other organizations, such as the National Recreation and Parks Association (NRPA).

Do we, as builders, practice green construction techniques? For example, do we recycle old drums, steel and nets that are still useable? Do we minimize waste and properly dispose of leftover surfacing materials, etc.? Do we encourage the construction of facilities that utilize green design concepts? Our next Technical Meeting in Austin will have a session on the proper disposal of sports surfaces.

Our challenge is to talk louder, talk more often, and listen better. If recent history is any guide, we may not be able to count on national leadership in this arena.


Gerry Wright, CTCB

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MEETINGS

TM2007
Austin Awaits December 1-3, 2007

It’s all-new and still has the best of everything.

It allows for renewing old friendships and making new contacts, for keeping up with new technology and finding out what still works best.

It’s held in a city that has history and tradition – and a strong commitment to the future.

It’s held near the end of one construction season (and near the end of one year) and the beginning of a new one.

In case you haven’t guessed yet, it’s the American Sports Builders Association’s Technical Meeting, to be held December 1-3 at the Hyatt Regency in Austin, Texas. The meeting includes the elements that you’ve come to know and love, including state-of-the-art technical sessions, a trade show full of products and services to help you work better and smarter, awards honoring the industry’s best and brightest, and tennis and golf tournaments to help make the most of friendly competition.

It also includes some great new elements like a special sit-down breakfast with intros and limitless opportunities for networking. The awards dinner is reformatted to honor the Facilities of the Year.

This year’s program will include a range of elements, covering tennis, track, fields and indoor sports surfaces, as well as design and business topics. Some samples of what is to come?

• How to Negotiate Unacceptable Clauses to a More Acceptable Form
• Concrete 101: Components, Mix Design, Additives, Fibers, Shrinking Compounds, Curing (a two-part, in-depth session
• Vapor Emissions: Causes and Remediation (another comprehensive two-part session)
• Subfloor Preparation
• Grading and Surfacing with Laser-Guided Equipment
• Post-Tensioned Concrete Tennis Courts: Materials and Methods
• Soils Testing; Stabilizing Poor Soils (again, a special two-part session)
• Robotics for Track Striping
• Track Edges, Footings, Sidewalk Details and Construction
• Tennis - Step-by-Step: Building a Subsurface Irrigated Court
… and much, much more. The entire program is in the process of being confirmed – look for it to be posted on the ASBA website soon.

Best of all, the whole event is set against a backdrop of old and new – the great city of Austin, Texas. Austin, the capital of the state, is also known as the "Live Music Capital of the World." On any given night, there are more than 150 live music venues, including "Austin City Limits," a TV show taped at the KLRU studios on the University of Texas campus and broadcast on PBS. Over the years, the show has featured performers ranging from Van Morrison to Alison Krause and Union Station to Coldplay to Elvis Costello to Michael McDonald.

The city is progressive – it ranks among one of the top areas in the country for free Wi-Fi. For fans, it is the home of the current TV show, “Friday Night Lights.” For sightseers, Austin boasts the largest statehouse in the country with eight acres of floor space, including the Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum, which covers everything from the conquistadors to the Alamo to Texas' role in space flight. Then there’s the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum and the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center.

You want culture? Great eating? Austin has both. For culture, there’s the Blanton Museum of Art, the largest university-owned art collection with more than 17,000 works. For food – for starters, the city is a haven of Tex-Mex and barbecue, as well as upscale bistros. There’s even the 80,000 square foot national headquarters of Whole Foods Market, described as a ‘culinary theme park.’ There’s shopping, including a host of trendy boutiques and eclectic specialty stores along South Congress Avenue (known as SoCo), which is within walking distance of the hotel. (The hotel is also close to the Sixth Street Entertainment District, an historic district with restaurants, nightclubs and shops, as well as the Second Street Retail District, a developing area of cafes, boutiques and specialty stores).

And while much of the rest of the nation is freezing, Austin’s average monthly temp in December is a welcome 62 degrees – great conditions for golf and tennis, as well as for sightseeing, shopping and enjoying the nightlife.

The local airport is Austin Bergstrom International Airport (abbreviated AUS) which is served by 12 airlines including American, Continental, Delta, Frontier, JetBlue, Northwest, Southwest, United and USAirways. Getting there couldn’t be easier.

There are great programs, a trade show and opportunities for networking and catching up with old friends – and the best city to do it all. Members will receive information on the Technical Meeting automatically; others can have their names added to the list by calling 866-501-ASBA (2722) or by e-mailing info@sportsbuilders.org.

See you in Austin – the home of the old and the new.

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FEATURED ARTICLES

Tradeline

Note: ASBA welcomes articles on industry topics from its members, and from others in the industry. Please contact the ASBA if you are interested in writing or submitting an article.

 

 

Worksite Safety – Part One
Surely it’s no coincidence that trade magazines are full of articles on safety. From SportsField Management to Grading and Excavation; from American Track & Field to Turf, publications are focusing on this important topic.

Why important? It is estimated that almost 6,000 workers will die on the job this year and more than two million will be seriously injured. The cost will be more than $3 billion in health care expenses, not including lost wages and production1.

What can you do to protect your business and your employees? Every job site is different, but most experts agree that worksite safety begins with building a safety culture. According to the Laborer’s Health and Safety Fund of North America (LHSFNA), “The best protection is a highly trained workforce and supervisory personnel who continually stress the importance of safety awareness.”

How to begin? Start during the off season by developing a proactive safety program using a safety handbook, job site safety posters, precautionary stickers and/or warning signs to identify hazards. Develop forms and checklists to document workplace accidents, including “near misses.”

1. Michael A Ferrara, Jr., http://cherryhill.injuryboard.com/worksite-injuries/worksite-safety-needs-to-be-fixed-2-million-injuries-and-6,000-deaths-is-unacceptable. May 9, 2007

Focus on Safety

Once the season begins, no matter how busy you are, don’t put safety on the “back burner.” Make workplace safety a priority. Many companies have proven that awareness is essential to prevention. When ITT launched a “Getting to Zero Accidents” program in three of its plants, it was able to achieve a 70% reduction in the number of days of lost work due to workplace accidents and reduce worker compensation costs by more than 80%. Think of the dollars saved by simply focusing on safety!

LHSFNA’s Executive Director Joe Fowler suggests that jobsite superintendents begin every shift with a safety meeting. “That way, consciousness is raised every day, worksite changes are reviewed and specific concerns can be addressed.”

Train Workers; Promote Safe Practices

The next step toward a safer workplace is training. Teach personnel how to use all equipment safely and in accordance with manufacturers’ recommendations.

Since back injuries are common in the construction industry (construction has the highest lost-time incident rate for back injuries – 51.2 lost time injuries per 10,000 full-time workers in 20042 ), make certain all employees learn proper techniques for lifting, moving, bending and so forth. Provide workers with lift-support belts, but minimize manual handling wherever possible. Make certain that materials are delivered and stored close to where they will be used and encourage the use of carts, dollies, hoists and forklifts as much as possible.

Slips, trips and falls are another common injury and, in most cases, these accidents are preventable. According to Barbara Mulhern, a safety specialist with the Professional Landcare Network (PLANET), common causes include:

• Tools, equipment and debris left out at work sites.
• Holes, trenches and other potential hazards which are not marked off with safety cones or tape.
• Workers running instead of walking or walking on wet grass or other unsafe surfaces.
• Spills which are not cleaned up immediately.
• Ladders set up on uneven terrain or workers who do not follow ladder safety rules.
• Employees who do not wear appropriate footwear with slip-resistant and puncture-resistant soles and reinforced toes.

Eye injuries, too, are a common, but preventable hazard. In an average year, construction workers suffer approximately 11,000 lost-time eye injuries. Experts estimate that 90% of these accidents could have been prevented through use of eye protection3. Safety glasses and goggles should include the “Z87” mark indicating that they meet the ANSI standard for eye protection. Equally importantly, eyewear should fit properly. Many injuries occur when workers are wearing ill-fitting eye protection, which allows splinters, dust or chemicals to enter around loose edges. Safety glasses for outdoor workers should be UV-rated to protect workers from the sun’s ultraviolet rays.

Speaking of the sun, how often do you show up on a jobsite to find everyone working shirtless and in shorts? Skin cancer is a serious problem among construction workers. Everyone, including dark-skinned workers, should take precautions including using sunscreen, wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants and hats with neck flaps. Sunscreen should be at least SPF 15 (SPR 30 is recommended) and should be re-applied not less than every two hours, with special attention to the face, neck and ears.

2. http://www.lhsfna.org/index.cfm?objectID=6EC8509D-D56F-E6FA-9C6D1DFAB9567172

3. http://www.lhsfna.org/index.cfm?objectID=4430F6A0-D56F-E6FA-95C4F112C94CB50C

Other simple on-site procedures to protect workers:

• Develop a written safety handbook including, at a minimum, drug and alcohol policies, motor vehicle safety, PPE (personal protective equipment) requirements, hazardous materials handling, equipment use, accident reporting and investigation.
• Require all personnel to dress to code, including boots, long pants, long-sleeved shirts, gloves, safety glasses, hard hats, masks or ear plugs as appropriate.
• Outfit every truck with safety equipment including some or all of the following – a fire extinguisher, a first aid kit, drinking water, gloves, safety road flares, triangles and/or orange cones. Make certain that each company vehicle has a checklist of what to do in case of a vehicle accident.
• Meet OSHA posting and regulatory requirements.
• Set up MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) books for every truck or worksite including everything from gas and oil to all the chemicals and materials used on site.
• Consider participating in the “Drug-Free Workplace” or “1-800-How’s My Driving” programs.
• Set up a program to reward foremen for safe driving and accident-free jobs.
• Encourage employees to work in pairs, especially when doing difficult work or long, difficult or complicated tasks.
• When such jobs are planned, conduct a safety meeting to review the potential hazards and to discuss necessary precautions.
• Keep water available and encourage the workers to take reasonable breaks in the shade, especially when it is hot.
• Inspect all tools, ladders and equipment before use. Power tools should be cleaned and checked for defective switches, cords, plugs and grounding. Defective equipment should not be used and should be labeled “defective.”

Encourage workers to recognize and report their physical limitations and work within them. Persuading workers to take a break when necessary, ask for help and avoid over exertion is essential for safety. Not only can heat and dehydration pose problems from workers, but an overly tired worker makes mistakes. Sometimes, those mistakes can lead to serious consequences. Within the limits of the law, ask employees to disclose any medical issues which may affect their health and safety on the job and assign their work appropriately. Request emergency contact information from all workers and keep it in a place where it is readily accessible.

Despite all precautions an accident may occur. Part Two, in the October issue of Newsline will discuss what to do when that happens.

Bibliography

1. “Back Injuries Plague Workforce,” http://www.lhsfna.org/index.cfm?objectID=6EC8509D-D56F-E6FA-9C6D1DFAB9467172
2. “Build Work Zone Safety Culture,” http://www.lhsfna.org/index.cfm?objectID=9EFD594B-D56F-E6FA-996826745B086173, Spring 2004
3. “Eye Injuries – Common but Preventable,” http://www.lhsfna.org/index.cfm?objectID=4430F6A0-D56FE6FA-95C4F112C94CB50XC
4. Michael A. Ferrara, Jr., “Worksite Safety Needs To Be Fixed: 2 Million Injuries and 6,000 Deaths is Unaccepttable,” http://cherryhill.injuryboard.com/worksite-injuries/worksite-safety-needs-to-be-fixed, May 9, 2007
5. “The importance of zero: ITT adopts no accident goal,” http://www.reliableplant.com/article.asp?articleid=6228, May, 2007
6. Tim Moore, CSFM, “Training Day: Give your staff the skills they need to be successful,” SportsField Management, April. 23-27, 2007, pp. 23-27.
7. Barbara Mulhern, “Accident Investigation: Getting to the root cause will help prevent recurrence,” Turf South, March 2007, pp. B10, B18.
8. Mulhern, “Slips, Trips and Falls: Common and costly injuries can be prevented,” Turf South, April 2007, pp. B24-27.
9. “Sun Sense Campaign Inspires New Habits,” http://www.lhsfna.org/index.cfm?objectID=44112750-D56F-E6FA-91295929772DB877
10. Patrick White, “Safety All-STARS: PLANET’s program to prevent workplace injuries,” February 2007, pp. B28. 34.

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Opinionline

Editor's Note: Articles in the "Opinion Line" column represent the opinions of their authors and not necessarily those of the ASBA. Readers are invited to respond. Please send comments to ASBA, Attn.: “Opinion Line,” 8480 Baltimore National Pike, #307, Ellicott City, MD 21043.

Concrete Tennis Court Mix Designs
Jonnie Deremo, CTCB, Phoenix, AZ

When building concrete courts, you should carefully consider mix designs for the concrete. In each part of the country, there are different materials being used in the mixture of concrete, the foremost being different types of aggregate. These different types of aggregate can and will affect acrylic tennis court surfacing.

In some parts of the country, there are aggregates with high metal contents. These aggregates should be avoided due to rusting that can reflect or even come through the coatings.

In areas west of the Mississippi River, aggregates can be high in alkali. These aggregates can cause alkali-silica reaction (ASR). ASR can and will cause all kinds of problems with the acrylic surfacing. To avoid ASR, certain types of admixtures such as fly ash can be added to the concrete mix to eliminate the risk.

The amount (percent) of air entrainment should be considered at different altitudes and in different climates.

When pouring concrete courts at different times of the year, hot or cold water can be added to the mixture to change the time you have to finish the cement before it sets off. In the construction of tennis courts, do not allow the use of “High Early;” this is a calcium chloride additive that also can have serious effects on acrylic coatings.

These are just a few of the things to consider when building concrete tennis courts. It is always best to spend some time with your local concrete supplier to explain the procedures and materials used in constructing and coating tennis courts so that they may provide you with the appropriate concrete mix design for your particular use & area.

 

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ASBA NEWS

COMMITTEES
Track Reps Meet with USATF, NCAA and NFHS
Again this spring, volunteers – this time Sam Fisher, CTB (Fisher Tracks, Inc., Boone, IA), Robert Cohen, CTB (Robert Cohen Co., LLC, Albuquerque, NM), John Schedler, CTB (FieldTurf Tarkett, Highlands Ranch, CO, Kristoff Eldridge, CTB (Cape & Island Tennis & Track, Pocasset, MA) and Jon Renner, CTB (Line Design, Inc., Littleton, CO), together with ASBA Executive Vice President Carol Hogan - met with governing body representatives P. Duffy Mahoney of USATF, Heather Perry of NCAA and Becky Oakes of NFHS to discuss track rules and the impact on construction.

The three governing bodies first explained how their rules are made and how ASBA might be involved:

USATF – The rules committee consists of volunteers, most of whom have never coached, built a track or managed an event. They are accountants, attorneys and others with an interest in public service. Some write hundreds of rules suggestions each year, but in the end, Mahoney said, USATF rules march in “lock step” with IAAF. It was Mr. Mahoney’s belief that a representative or representatives of ASBA would not be welcome nor would unsolicited input from ASBA.

NCAA – Ms. Perry reported that NCAA rules are made by a subcommittee of the Track & Field Committee, which consists of 50% coaches, 20% administrators and 30% others. Because the Track & Field Committee deals with so many responsibilities and because these persons have so many other duties in their jobs, most burn out quickly. There is little continuity among committee members. Bob Podkaminer, who is the Secretary to the Committee, is the official interpreter of the rules and the person upon whom most committee members rely when it comes to questions about rules. He is willing to meet with ASBA. It was noted that last year, when a significant revision was made to Rule 1, Mr. Podkaminer submitted a draft to ASBA for comment.

Ms. Perry suggested that ASBA could be most effective by educating those involved in the construction of track facilities as to the materials and services which it can provide. ASBA might do that by appearing on the program or at least having a booth at the meeting of the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) and at the National Association of Women Collegiate Athletic Administrators (NAWCAA).

NFHS – Ms. Oakes stated that NFHS rules are made by an 11-person committee that meets the first week of June in Indianapolis. During that meeting, the committee members go over new rules changes and have special presentations on specific areas of interest within track and field. They might be open to a presentation from ASBA. She agreed that ASBA should work at educating owners and managers and suggested that it make a presentation on planning and building a track at the high school athletics directors meeting in December. She will work to get such a topic on the program. She also suggested that ASBA send a representative to the Rules Interpreters Meeting in January.

Discussion began regarding an issue previously discussed at the 2006 meeting. All agreed that one of the problems we face is that the architect chosen for a school project often is unfamiliar with track design, or that portion of the school project is delegated to a junior associate. It was clear that all of us have an interest in assisting owners and professional designers in designing facilities correctly, in a way which best meets their needs. This task is especially challenging where the track surrounds a field and where the facility will be used for multiple sports and other uses.

Suggestions to promote the availability of information from ASBA included:

• NFHS to link to ASBA’s website. Many persons planning track projects come to the NFHS website as a starting place, but NFHS has no technical information on track construction. Ms. Oakes will place a link to ASBA’s website and list the information available there.
• Develop a project related to sports facility design and make it available to professors at schools of architecture.
• Work through coaches associations. Mr. Mahoney suggested that ASBA look not only at Division I schools, which are active in the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association (USTFCCCA), but to the junior college, Christian schools and larger state coaches associations.

Ms. Oakes asked that ASBA develop a one-page piece describing the information and services it provides that she could make available to her state associations. Ms. Hogan and Mr. Fisher suggested that ASBA might be able to provide a copy of the track and fields construction manuals to each state association. There are 51 of them.

Ms. Hogan noted that ASBA has been providing a series of articles to American Track & Field. Ms. Oakes said that she might be able to place articles. Ms. Hogan asked that Ms. Oakes provide a list of common questions she receives so that ASBA can target its articles to the appropriate areas of need.

ASBA then introduced a proposal regarding color coding, suggesting that NFHS and NCAA alter some of their suggested color markings because more and more tracks are red and red markings do not show up well on red tracks. Also, red paint breaks down from UV exposure more quickly than other colors. Jon Renner had developed a handout which Ms. Oakes and Ms. Perry could share with their rules committees. ASBA suggested:

Change the markings for the 4 x 200 from red to white (including start lines and exchange zones);
Change the markings for the 300m hurdles from red to white; and
NCAA change the markings for the steeplechase barriers from black to blue.

The group then discussed possible future topics for future cooperation and discussion:

• Multiuse fields – How to plan a facility and anticipate consequences; for example, an owner often will want the widest possible soccer field, only to learn that corner kicks then must be made from the track surface, damaging the track.
• Issues to consider in renovation.
• Common practice, especially as related to safety – i.e., overrun areas, hard and unyielding surface (i.e., the track is not a safety surface), the size of the jumping pit.

ASBA then presented a proposal for track certification at various levels. Lengthy discussion ensued, especially about what is appropriate, affordable and reasonable at the high school level. Most coaches aspire one day to host a large meet or believe that they may one day have an extraordinary athlete, even if those beliefs are unreasonable. For that reason, all of them want a track of the highest possible caliber. Unfortunately, building to a higher standard significantly increases cost. It will be the goal of this document to provide guidance as to appropriate certification for tracks at different levels of use. Jon Renner will take the suggestions made by those present and modify the proposal.

All present agreed that this meeting continues to be invaluable and should be held annually. Ms. Hogan suggested that we might bring in more representatives, including Division representatives from other sports, perhaps a designer, even legal counsel, to discuss multiuse fields surrounded by a track and legal issues associated with common practice, not in the rules (i.e., placement of fencing around a track.)

 

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MEMBER NEWS

MemberlineEditor’s Note: Information contained in MembeLine is submitted by members and published without verification. Its publication does not constitute an endorsement.

 

 

Le Monde Chosen for Military World Games/Jefferson Parish
The Artillery Centre in Hyderabad, India has selected FieldTurf Tarkett’s (Montreal, PQ) Le Monde track system for the Military World Games to be held in October. Organized every four years, the event will feature participants from more than 130 countries making it the second largest athletic event in the world after the Olympics.

Also choosing the Le Monde system is Jefferson Parish Public Schools in New Orleans. Jefferson Parish will install two FieldTurf fields surrounded by LeMonde tracks at their East and West Jefferson Stadiums. First constructed in the 1950s, these stadiums were heavily damaged by Hurricane Katrina. It is hoped that facility improvements will provide an emotional boost to Jefferson Parish students.

For further information, call 800-724-2969 or visit www.fieldturftarkett.com.

Lee Tennis to Host Conference on Indoor Clay Courts
Lee Tennis (Charlottesville, VA), the manufacturer of Har-Tru®, will be hosting its Fourth Annual Conference on Indoor Clay Courts August 27-28, 2007. The purpose of the conference is to bring together leading experts on indoor clay courts to discuss their construction and maintenance in an indoor environment. Lee Tennis will share new information on the causes of indoor surface compaction and the techniques being used to alleviate it. Additionally, there will be a discussion of ClayTech™, a new surface from Lee. Attendees will tour several indoor facilities and participate in Q&A sessions with facility managers and maintenance personnel. The conference will be held at Sportime Syosset in Syosset, NY. For information, contact Pat Hanssen at 1-877-4HARTRU or phanssen@luckstone.com or visit the indoor forum on the Lee Tennis website at www.leetennis.com/indoorforum.

Geller Sport Joins Stantec
Geller Sport Inc. (Boston, MA) has announced the transfer of its business operations to Stantec, a global firm providing professional design and consulting services. With more than 6,500 employees, Stantec operates out of more than 100 locations in North America and trades on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the symbol SXC.

Patrick Maguire, President of Geller Sport, believes that as part of Stantec, former Geller professionals “will be able to offer an expanded roster of services, as well as an improved ability to serve clients throughout North America and abroad.”

Competition Athletic Surfaces Adds “Infield”
After a challenging project involving the installation of rooftop walking track for UnumProvident Corp. (See Newsline April 2006), Competition Athletic Surfaces (Chattanooga, TN) has done it again. UnumProvident found that the rubber mats, originally placed within the track for a seating area, blew in the wind. They liked the track surface so much that they asked the builder to come back and install it in the infield. “So,” says Lee Murray, Competition’s Vice President of Sales, “we rented a crane and hauled our equipment and materials up there again!”

Tim Beyer Joins Lee Tennis
Tim Beyer has joined Lee Tennis (Charlottesville, VA) to focus on new market sales. Beyer’s efforts will center on creating Har-Tru® and ClayTech™ playing experiences for players in non-traditional clay court markets such as northern and southern California and Arizona.

Beyer, a graduate of Ferris State’s Professional Tennis Marketing Program, began his tennis career as a teaching professional. He later held key manager positions in Promotions and Sports Marketing with Wilson Sporting Goods’ Racquet Sports Division and served as Director of Research and Statistical Marketing with the USPTA.

K&W Engineers Adds Landscape Architects
K&W Engineers and Consultants (Harrisburg, PA) has added Brian S. Bingeman, RLA and Christopher S. Curci to its staff of experienced professionals. Bingeman is a Pennsylvania Registered Landscape Architect with nineteen years of experience in planning, design and construction management of institutional, athletic facility/recreational, residential and commercial projects. Formerly, he was a principal at Brubaker Bingeman, LLC, a Landscape Architecture firm which specialized in the development of athletic/recreational facilities. He will serve as Director of Landscape Architecture.

Curci is a graduate Landscape Architect with 10 years of professional experience in the landscape architecture and civil engineering fields that includes master planning, design and development plans for large recreational, park, municipal, commercial-industrial, retail and residential projects. He will serve as a Project Professional.

Club Developer Chooses ProClay
Albert Khanlarian, a well known tennis facility owner and tennis pro, chose NGI Sports’ (Chattanooga, TN) ProClay for Piedmont Indoor Tennis, a new eight court facility located in Greensboro, NC. This is Khanlarian’s third club and will feature both hard and soft courts indoors. Khanlarian tested and played on a number of different clay-like surfaces before choosing the Nova’ProClay, which consists of a patented monolithic inner layer topped with traditional fast-dry surface granules and clay court lines. Installation of four ProClay courts was completed in 10 days by a crew from Court One (Granite Quarry, NC).

Lee Tennis Supports Tennis Channel
Lee Tennis (Charlottesville, VA), the maker of Har-Tru®, kicked off its first national television sponsorship with the Tennis Channel on May 27. During Roland Garros (May 27 – June 10), the only clay court Grand Slam event, Lee Tennis sponsored live in match features, custom vignettes and billboards highlighting the history, benefits and beauty of clay courts.

John Welborn, director of business development at Lee Tennis, said “We are avid advocates of clay tennis surfaces and believe in advancing the clay court tennis experience.”

The Tennis Channel presented more than 100 hours from Roland Garros, often called the French Open, and produced programming for both its own broadcast and that of ESPN2.

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New Members

The following companies have joined the ASBA or renewed their membership since the last NEWSLINE. Please add their names to the appropriate section of your Membership Directory.


Dale Harris, Senior Project Manager
Coler & Colantonio, Inc. (P)
101 Accord Park Drive
Norwell, MA 02061
781-982-5400
dharris@col-col.com

John Conners, President
Performance Surfaces, LLC (B)
821 W. Wilshire Blvd.
Oklahoma City, OK 73116
405-463-0505
jconners@performancesurfaces.com
Robert Wolesensky, President
Dynamic Sports Construction, Inc. (B)
301 Sonny Drive
Leander, TX 78641
512-260-6722
bobw@dynamicsportsconstruction.com
www.dynamicsportsconstruction.com
Leonard Faiola, Director of Business Development
Remingtom & Vernick Engineers (P)
232 Kings Highway East
Haddonfield, NJ 08033
856-795-9595
Fax: 856-795-1882
lfaiola@rve.com
www.rve.com
Jere Tatich, Principal
Elan Planning & Design, Inc. (P)
112 Spring Street, #305
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
518-306-3702
Fax: 518-226-0469
info@elanpd.com
www.elanpd.com
Robert Retnauer, Principal
Retnauer Design Associates, LLC (P)
409 Lake Ave.
Saint James, NY 11780
631-979-5600
bob@retnauer-design.com
www.retnauer-design.com
Brian Bingeman
K&W Engineers and Consultants (P)
470 Friendship Road, #100
Harrisburg, PA 17111
717-635-2835
Fax: 717-635-2836
bbingeman@kandwengineers.com
www.kandwengineers.com
John Giraud, Managing Director
Target Technologies International, Inc. (AA)
203B – 3430 Brighton Ave.
Burnaby, BC Canada V5A 3H4
604-421-3620
jbgiraud@ttiionline.com
www.ttiionline.com
David LaSota, President
DW LaSota Engineering, Inc.
P. O. Box 26
901 6th Ave.
Patton, PA 16668
814-674-2650
mburkey@dwlasotaeng.com
 

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CALENDAR  

Nov 28 – Dec 1, 2007
Athletic Business Conference, Orange County Convention Center, Orlando, FL. For more information, www.athleticbusinessconference.com

December 1-3, 2007
ASBA Technical Meeting, Hyatt Regency Austin, Austin, TX. For information 866-501-ASBA (2722) or www.sportsbuilders.org.

January 16-20, 2008
SportsTurf Managers Association Conference, Phoenix Civic Plaza Convention Center, Phoenix, AZ. For information www.sportsturfmanager.org.

February 21-25, 2008
ASBA Winter Meeting, Hilton El Conquistador, Tucson, AZ. For information 866-501-ASBA (2722) or www.sportsbuilders.org.

December 3-6, 2008
Athletic Business Conference, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, San Antonio, TX. For more information, www.athleticbusiness conference.com

December 7-9, 2008
ASBA Technical Meeting, Astor Crowne Plaza, New Orleans, LA. For information 866-501-ASBA (2722) or www.sportsbuilders.org.

December 2-5, 2009
Athletic Business Conference, Orange County Convention Center, Orlando, FL For more information, www.athleticbusinessconference.com

December 5-7, 2009
ASBA Technical Meeting, Hyatt Regency Savannah, Savannah, GA. For information 866-501-ASBA (2722) or www.sportsbuilders.org.

December 5-7, 2010
ASBA Technical Meeting, Marriott Sawgrass, Ponte Vedra Beach, FL. For information 866-501-ASBA (2722) or www.sportsbuilders.org.

Note: Updated information on ASBA meetings can often be found on the website; please contact www.sportsbuilders.org.

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FYI

Battle of the Surfaces
In an interesting lead up to Roland Garros and Wimbledon, Number Two Rafael Nadal edged out Number One Roger Federer during a so-called “Battle of the Surfaces,” an exhibition in Mallorca in May. The 2006 French Open champion Nadal had won 72 straight matches on clay, while Wimbledon champion for the last four years, Federer, had won 48 consecutive matches on grass.

For this match a special court, clay on one side of the net and grass on the other, was constructed. Changeovers were extended to two minutes to allow players to change their footwear for each surface. The world’s top two players traded breaks in the third set before Nadal edged out Federer in a tie-break. The Spaniard prevailed 7-5, 4-6, 7-6 (12-10).

Are Your High Performers Ready to Quit?
According to a study of 16,237 employees on workforce and retention issues conducted by Leadership IQ, 47% of high performers are actively looking for other jobs (submitting resumes and going on interviews). Unfortunately, while the high performers are thinking about quitting, the low performers want to stay; only 18% of low performing employers are actively looking for jobs.

Mark Murphy, CEO of Leadership IQ, reports that employers typically cause high performers to want to quit by treating them worse than other employees. He says, “When a manager has a difficult project, upon which the whole company depends, who do they go to?” Bosses go to the high performers over and over, causing them extra stress and longer hours, while low performers typically get easier jobs because their bosses can’t count on them and even avoid them.

Leadership IQ offers seminars, onsite training, e-learning, books and other training aids to build company leaders. For more information, visit www.leadershipiq.com.

Pro Football Players Still Prefer Grass
Despite the astounding growth of synthetic turf in the sports field marketplace, the 2007 survey of National Football League players still indicates that they prefer grass. According to an article in Athletic Turf News (www.athleticturf.net), almost three-quarters (73%) of the 1,452 players responding stated that they preferred playing on grass. Even though infilled turf testing shows that modern synthetic turf surfaces provide force reduction, nearly two-thirds (65%) of the players indicated that they think that synthetic surfaces are “more likely to contribute to injury,” and 73.87% stated that they believe artificial surfaces contribute to “soreness and fatigue.”

When asked to select their favorite playing fields, players ranked the three best natural grass fields: 1) Tampa Bay’s Raymond James Stadium, 2) Charlotte’s Bank of America Stadium and 3) Arizona’s University of Phoenix Stadium. As to artificial playing fields, players rated the following as best: 1) Seattle’s Quest Field, 2) Detroit’s Ford Field and 3) Baltimore’s M&T Bank Stadium.

3-Point Rule
According to the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the new three-point line will be at 20 feet, 9 inches for men. It will be effective for the 2008-2009 season. The women’s line will remain at the current location, 19 feet, 9 inches. The new line must be a contrasting color.

American Track & Field Offers Service to ASBA Members
Thinking about advertising in American Track & Field magazine to tie in to ASBA’s articles (see box below)? AT&F is offering a new service to ASBA-affiliated advertisers. AT&F will ask the 35,000 coaches and facility managers who receive either American Track & Field or Coaching Athletics to e-mail ATFFacilitiesRequestor@gmail.com and provide their needs, their contact information, their budget and their timeline for construction and renovation work. AT&F will send those requests to ASBA-affiliated advertisers. For more information, contact American Track & Field at 920.563.5551.

ASBA Articles in American Track & Field:

“Water on Tracks, Part I,” Winter 2005
“ Water on Tracks, Part II,”Spring 2006
“ Track Resurfacing,” American Track & Field, Summer 2006
“ 200-Meter Tracks,” Submitted for American Track & Field, Fall 2006
“ Field Events for Multi-Sport Facilities,” Winter 2006
“Ghosting on Tracks,” Resource Guide 2006
“Track Security,” Spring 2007
“ 2006 Track of the Year Award Winner,” Global Merit Issue 2007
“ Running Track Amenities,” Summer 2007

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