American Sports Builders Association


American Sports Builders Association
April 2007


April 2007

Welcome to the latest innovation from ASBA - NEWSLINE on-line!

From the Chair
Gerry Wright, CTCB
In a recent issue of Rolling Stone magazine, an article proclaimed the new “Guitar Gods” of this generation: John Mayer, Derek Trucks, of his own Derek Trucks Band, and the Allan Brothers and John Frusciante of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Guitar players have long provided the sizzle to rock and roll music, and thus have often become its icons. They pay tribute to and were influenced by early trailblazers such as Jimi Hendrix, Buddy Guy, Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page. It’s this passing of the torch that bodes well for the continued creativity and appeal of this music. Although rock and roll has a colorful and storied past, its future lies in its young guns. Read more...
Meetings
WM2007
Perfect Weather, Great Program Make St. Pete Beach WM a Hit! As the old Beatles song goes, “It’s getting better all the time.” It could have been the theme song for the 2007 ASBA Winter Meeting, which returned for a third time to the TradeWinds Hotel at St. Pete Beach in sunny Florida. The meeting, which was held February 23-26, was wildly successful in every respect. Read more...

Winter Meeting Sports
Take a bit of good-natured rivalry, throw in a lot of heckling and, of course, consider that a year’s worth of bragging rights are at stake, and you come up with the atmosphere surrounding ASBA’s Winter Games – the sports and competitions offered at its recent Winter Meeting. Read more...

Trivia Quiz
See how you do on Bill Righter's (Nova Sports USA, Milford, PA) Trivia Quiz. To find out who won the contest, see Winter Meeting Sports. Read more...

Featured Articles

TradelineHigh Performance Teams
At the recent Sports and Play Construction Association (SAPCA) meeting, Keynote Speaker Spike Jepson, former team leader of The Red Arrows, a 9-man UK aerobatic flying team similar to The Blue Angels, spoke on Teamwork in a High Pressure Environment. Read more...

OpinionlineBuilding on Poor Soil
By Linn Lower, CTCB, Lower Bros. Co., Inc., Bimingham, AL
How do you build a stable pad on poor material? Read more...

ASBA News
Members of the Board
American Sports Builders Association, 8480 Baltimore National Pike, #307, Ellicott City, MD 21043, 866.501.ASBA (2722). www.sportsbuilders.org. A complete listing of the Officers and Directors of ASBA. Read more...

Board Happenings
Significant accomplishments of the Board at the Winter Meeting. Read More...

Can We "Quote" You?
What’s better than advertising? How about free advertising? If you agree to be contacted as a source for ASBA’s technical articles, it could mean additional promotion and exposure for your company and for you personally. Read more...

Bill Dougherty, Sr.
Bill Dougherty Sr. (Star-Trac Enterprises, LLC, Southfield, MI) passed away peacefully in his sleep on February 9 after a long illness. Dougherty was a long time member of the industry and of the ASBA. A memorial service will be planned for later this year. Our sympathies to Bill Jr., Rick and the Dougherty and Star-Trac families.

Member News

Calendar of Events
Important Dates
Mark your calendar for the ASBA Technical Meeting in Austin, TX. Read more...

FYI
Approved OSHA Training Courses in English and Spanish Available Online
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has approved online safety training courses available through OSHA Pros, Inc. A 10-hour Construction Course in Spanish is available as is a 30-hour General Industry Course in English. For details on these and more online courses, visit www.osha-pros.com.

Turf Shoes Prevent Injury
Footwear designed specifically for playing soccer and football on artificial turf can reduce the risk of stress fracture according to findings presented in June at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). Read more...

Protecting Customer and Employee Data
Given the number of well-publicized breaches of data security at major corporations, what are you doing to protect your customer and employee data? Read more...

Speaking of Phishing
Wondering if that e-mail is a phishing scam? Want to do your part to stop phishing? Read more...

Eye Q’s and Views
Helpful hints to avoid eye problems while on the computer. Read more...

Tennis in the Park Update
128 applications have been received in the first round of this year’s Tennis in the Parks (TIP) grant program. Read more...

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From the Chair
In a recent issue of Rolling Stone magazine, an article proclaimed the new “Guitar Gods” of this generation: John Mayer, Derek Trucks, of his own Derek Trucks Band, and the Allan Brothers and John Frusciante of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Guitar players have long provided the sizzle to rock and roll music, and thus have often become its icons. They pay tribute to and were influenced by early trailblazers such as Jimi Hendrix, Buddy Guy, Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page. It’s this passing of the torch that bodes well for the continued creativity and appeal of this music. Although rock and roll has a colorful and storied past, its future lies in its young guns.

At our Technical Meeting in Daytona Beach and our Winter Meeting in St. Pete Beach, it was refreshing to see the number of younger attendees, many of whom were second or even third generation members. Their energy and fresh perspective is welcome in an environment where strategies and actions can become stale. Us "older coots" bring a lot of experience to the table but it is the energetic involvement of the next generation that will determine how successful our actions will be.

As your Board of Directors, we often solicit our members for their feedback on the actions that we take and their input on what issues we should address. Our agenda includes not only issues that directly and tangibly affect your membership benefits, such as Technical Meeting Program content, but also opportunities that may have a more intangible effect.

At a Membership Satisfaction roundtable last Winter Meeting in San Antonio, through an on-line survey recently completed, and at our Luncheon Meeting with the members in St. Pete Beach, it became clear that as an Association we are doing a lot of the tangible things reasonably well, but that there are other issues that we must work on. We have worked for a number of years to develop and improve relationships with governing bodies such as ITF, USTA, NCAA and USATF, and with related organizations such as TIA, RSI, Athletic Business and STMA. This has helped to increase the visibility and credibility of the ASBA.

Another mandate from the members is to increase our visibility with design professionals and to better market our membership through our Association. One significant initiative in this area will be to fund the improvement of our website to make it more user-friendly, and more effective in collecting and disseminating information. In this age of electronically-driven information technology, your Board gallantly crawls into the 21st century. No doubt with the help of our next generation, we will soon stride confidently.


Gerry Wright, CTCB

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MEETINGS

WM2007
Perfect Weather, Great Program Make St. Pete Beach WM a Hit!

As the old Beatles song goes, “It’s getting better all the time.” It could have been the theme song for the 2007 ASBA Winter Meeting, which returned for a third time to the TradeWinds Hotel at St. Pete Beach in sunny Florida.

The meeting, which was held February 23-26, was wildly successful in every respect. Perfect weather meant sunny days and starry nights, warm sands and balmy breezes. It brought great opportunities for water sports, sunbathing, sightseeing and of course, the main event, the meeting itself, which allowed members to get intensively involved with Association projects, publications and programs. Co-chairmen Bill Righter (Nova Sports USA, Milford, MA) and Rick Ryan (Advanced Polymer Technology Corp., Harmony, PA) planned and executed an exciting, inclusive program as well as many extracurricular activities.

There were topics of interest to tennis, track, sports field and indoor multi-sport facility professionals. Some touched on concerns of all members – for example, David Pettit, ASBA’s legal counsel, presented a program entitled Design Defects, Rising Material Costs and Other Job Hazards – How to Protect Yourself by Contract and Otherwise. Another multi-disciplinary program, Defining Asphalt Standards – Mix Design, Delivery and Installation Guidelines for Tennis and Track Construction, was given by Sam Fisher, CTB (Fisher Tracks, Inc., Boone, IA) and Gordy Pierce, CTCB (Cape & Island Tennis & Track, Pocasset, MA).


Chairman Gerry Wright leading a session

Some sessions included those pertaining to the Association and its programs. Technical Meeting/Winter Meeting – What Can Be Improved? and the Member Satisfaction Focus Group, for example, were well-received, and drew many valuable suggestions. Attendees also contributed to sessions about the drafting of a track certification procedure and to fields guidelines and position papers, as well as a fields awards application. Presentations on the Tennis Courts book, the indoor construction manual and the fields book allowed participants to make suggestions on ways to present and update the information the ASBA publishes.

Between sessions and after hours, attendees were able to enjoy the company of their colleagues and competitors and to drink in the surroundings of an area far removed from the snow and ice many were facing. Competitive events, including the Golf, Tennis, Fishing and Trivia Tournaments, offered diversions as well (for more information on these events, see the next article).

Beneath the sunny skies, attendees enjoyed the beachfront accommodations of the TradeWinds, which offered not only first-class amenities, but also the relaxed, tropical feel of a barefoot vacation resort. Those who wanted to get out and enjoy the city’s cultural sights and nightlife found them easily accessible, but were equally tempted to just kick back and enjoy the seaside ambience.

What’s that? You missed the meeting? Don’t miss your next chance to make connections, catch up on the latest industry developments and get more involved with the Association – the Technical Meeting will be held December 2-4, 2007 at the Hyatt Regency Austin, Austin, TX. Members will receive information automatically; others can have their names added to the list by calling 866.501.ASBA (2722) or by e-mailing info@sportsbuilders.org. Look for updates on the ASBA website, www.sportsbuilders.org.

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Winter Meeting Sports
ake a bit of good-natured rivalry, throw in a lot of heckling and, of course, consider that a year’s worth of bragging rights are at stake, and you come up with the atmosphere surrounding ASBA’s Winter Games – the sports and competitions offered at its recent Winter Meeting. The meeting, which took place at the TradeWinds on St. Pete Beach from February 23-26, offered not only the opportunity to get involved with the Association’s publications and activities, but the chance to even old scores on the golf course, tennis courts and in other areas.

This year’s Winter Meeting Golf Tournament was chaired by Robert Werner, CTB, CTCB (Sportsline, Inc. Villanova, PA). In the spirit of keeping things interesting, Rob scored the tournament in a different manner, tabulating scores according to “couples.” Rick Ryan (Advanced Polymer Technology Corp, Harmony, PA) and Gerry Wright, CTCB (Court One, Youngsville, NC) were the highest scoring couple at 116. Scores ranged from 86-116. Other distinguished awards went to John Welborn (Lee Tennis, Charlottesville, VA) for Ugliest Shot and to Gordy Pierce, CTCB (Cape and Island Tennis and Track, Pocasset, MA) for Rookie of the Year. This year, the award for Closest to the Pin (8' from the mark) was Bill "Hit It” Righter (Nova Sports USA, Milford, MA). The Longest Drive prize went to Dave Marsden, CTCB (Boston Tennis Court Construction Co., Hanover, MA).


High scoring golf couple Rick Ryan & Gerry Wright

Up next? The ever-popular ASBA Tennis Tournament. Tom DeRosa (DeRosa Tennis Contractors, Mamaroneck, NY) was the chairman of the tournament, played on Har-Tru courts which were, unfortunately, bone-dry. (Apparently, not every owner/manager reads Tennis Courts: A Construction and Maintenance Manual.)

David Clapp, CTB, CTCB (Baseline Sports Construction, LLC, Knoxville, TN) and ASBA legal counsel David Pettit came in second. The first-place doubles team was made up of Tom DeRosa and new member Bill Hein (Visionaire Lighting, Rancho Dominguez, CA). Tom waived his winner's prize and gave it to newest participant (and lowest scoring) Bob Cohen, CTB, (Robert Cohen Co., LLC, Abuquerque, NM.) Let’s hear it for the great combination of heckling and sportsmanship!


Tennis Players

Tennis Tournament Winners and Runners-Up, l-r David Clapp, Bill Hein, Tom DeRosa and David Pettit

Then there was ASBA’s Fishing Tournament, chaired by Andy Little (Sparton Enterprises, Inc., Barberton, OH). Because conditions were too windy to go out in a boat, participants dropped their lines from a nearby bridge. Rick Ryan (Advanced Polymer Technology Corp, Harmony, PA) caught the first fish as well as the most fish (two). Frank DePaul (Sportsline, Inc. Villanova, PA) caught the biggest fish, although, as all participants agreed, the fish was a bit smaller than the usual prize winner. DePaul also had the dubious distinction of hooking a large net that had drifted under the bridge.


Fishermen

Frank DePaul &
his big catch


Rick Ryan baits a hook


The Trivia Contest at the final dinner was won by Frank DePaul (Sportsline, Inc., Villanova, PA), Mark Brogan, CTCB (Pro-Sport Construction, Inc., Devon, PA), John Schedler, CTB (Fieldturf Tarkett, Montreal, Canada), Robert Werner, CTB, CTCB (Sportsline, Inc., Villanova, PA), Bob Cohen, CTB (Robert Cohen Co., LLC, Albuquerque, NM) and Andy Little (Sparton Enterprises, Inc., Barberton, OH). Players used plenty of (No, surely not!) unauthorized ‘lifelines’ to answer their questions – wireless Internet on Blackberries, covert phone calls to friends and more than a few information swaps. Bill Righter (Nova Sports USA, Milford, MA) designed the contest, which was enjoyed by all.

For those who won, the chance to defend their titles, reputations and bragging rights comes up at the Technical Meeting, to be held December 2-4, 2007 at the Hyatt Regency Austin, Austin, TX. (And for those who didn’t win…? Better mark your calendars for this meeting. It might be your big chance.)

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Trivia Quiz

1. Which is the northernmost Florida Key?
2. Where in Florida were the Tarzan movies filmed?
3. From what country did the United States buy Florida in 1845?
4. What nation established Fort Caroline in 1564 in what is now Jacksonville?
5. What is the state of Florida’s official saltwater fish?
6. In the move “The Waterboy,” what was Adam Sandler’s character name?
7. What Hall of Fame baseball player adorned the very first cover of Sports Illustrated magazine in 1954?
8. What is Donald Duck’s middle name?
9. What are the names of Donald Duck’s nephews?
10. The Disney cartoon characters Heckel and Jeckel are what kind of birds?

Answers:
1. Key Largo
2. Silver Springs
3. Spain
4. France
5. Atlantic Sailfish
6. Bobby Boucher
7. Eddie Mathews
8. Fauntleroy
9. Huey, Dewey and Louie
10. Magpies

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FEATURED ARTICLES

Tradeline

Note: ASBA welcomes articles on industry topics from its members, and from others in the industry. Please contact the ASBA if you are interested in writing or submitting an article.

High Performance Teams
At the recent Sports and Play Construction Association (SAPCA) meeting, Keynote Speaker Spike Jepson, former team leader of The Red Arrows, a 9-man UK aerobatic flying team similar to The Blue Angels, spoke on Teamwork in a High Pressure Environment.

You don’t find many environments more risky than flying fighter jets in formation with just six feet between wingtips. Not only is The Red Arrow mission complex, difficult and calling for split-second adjustment, but the team works under what appears, at least at first, to be a huge disadvantage. At the end of each flying season, the three most experienced team members leave and every other remaining member of the team changes position in the flying formation. Yet, the team carries on producing the same results.

Despite the challenges facing them, Jepson maintains that members of The Red Arrows choose their attitudes because team goals are consistent with their personal goals. They aren’t necessarily dedicated, passionate, self-sacrificing individuals. Instead, they choose to become members of an outstanding team. This happens, he says, because The Red Arrows have created a process and a culture that supports the development of such teams.

That process starts with selection. Candidates are chosen after spending several days in the company of the continuing team members. Certainly, there is a chance for them to demonstrate their flying skills, but that is not the most important criterion. Team members can learn to be better pilots. What the team is looking for are people who will commit to team goals. That means people who will surrender their own egos, demonstrate commitment and dedication to the team and be trustworthy. In this case, trustworthiness is defined as being able to admit mistakes and take criticism. A team player, who can’t admit to a mistake, can’t be trusted to learn from those mistakes. The ability to learn and grow from mistakes is crucial to success. The more risky the venture, the more critical it is.

Next is a clear mission. The Red Arrows’ mission is to fly a perfect show every time. They set their own standards. They do not compare themselves to anyone; in fact, they consider the performance of others irrelevant. Every time they fly, every show, they aim to be perfect.

Even when a team is made up of outstanding individual performers, there is no shortcut to training. Each member of the team trains constantly to improve his own flying skills and the team, as a whole, trains to improve its coordination. As an interesting aside, there are no extra pilots in The Red Arrows, no understudies. The team has brought each pilot in, made a commitment to him and expects him to succeed. There is no Plan B.

The Reds spend a great deal of time planning. Of course, for them, planning is an unnatural process. By style, these are action people. It’s more fun to do something than to talk about it. But, according to Jepson, if you don’t apply the same standard of planning to every event, big or small, the standards for the important things will be lower. Each pre-show briefing includes a review of weather, a “what if” exercise talking out what to do in a given emergency (Jepson calls this high pressure planning in a low pressure environment) and event-specific planning.

When doing “what if” planning, Jepson says it is important to prioritize. In aviation, the priorities in order of importance are aviate, navigate, communicate. For example, if the team flew into a fog bank, the first priority for each team member would be to keep flying his airplane and find a way to get out of close proximity to the other planes without hitting any of them. Next, the pilot would fly to someplace safe and finally, he would communicate with the other team members to come up with a plan to regroup. Priorities will vary depending on the type of team and the type of event.

Once the event is over comes what Jepson calls the most powerful tool for improving team performance – the debriefing. Debriefing allows the team to develop and share best practices and accelerate its performance. It also keeps the team’s feet on the ground; complacency, according to Jepson, can be a killer.

For debriefing to be successful, however, Jepson says that the proper culture is essential. He describes that culture as “no rank, no name, and no attitude.” No rank means everyone from the boss down is equal in the debriefing. Everyone, from the top down, must feel confident enough to admit his own mistakes without fear of shame or criticism. No name means The Reds refer to mistakes by position numbers – “One was late on the smoke; Five wobbled in that formation; Nine was out of position.” It’s not a person making a mistake, it’s a position. That way, no one feels defensive. No attitude means members of the team must point out performance errors without pointing fingers. Fifteen percent of communication is words, according to Jepson, and 85% is attitude. Each member of the team must feel safe and supported and each must be willing to take ownership of his part of any team error.

Jepson says that introducing and ensuring a positive culture of debriefing is difficult, but it is the single strongest tool to improve team performance. During debriefing, authority devolves; team members analyze errors without excuses and learn to correct them.

Great teams are not an accident and they are not necessarily made up of outstanding individual performers. Instead, says Jepson, great teams come from process and culture. High performance teams are about people choosing to commit to team goals, accept the culture, choose their attitudes, dedicate themselves to the team, be determined to succeed and committed to participating in the process.

“Ultimately,” says Jepson, “it’s about people. When people believe in what they are doing, they will come together as a team to do it.”

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Opinionline

Editor's Note: Articles in the "Opinion Line" column represent the opinions of their authors and not necessarily those of the ASBA. Readers are invited to respond. Please send comments to ASBA, Attn.: “Opinion Line,” 8480 Baltimore National Pike, #307, Ellicott City, MD 21043.

Building on Poor Soil
Linn Lower, CTCB, Lower Bros. Co., Inc., Bimingham, AL

For the most part, we are blessed to be in an area of the country (Southeast) with good soil on which to build tennis courts (sandy red clay, chert, limestone, sandstone, etc.). For this reason, stone base and asphalt are the preferred materials used in court construction.

There are, however, some places in our area of operation where the soil conditions are most unstable. The locals refer to this poor material as “prairie soil.” It ranges in color from white to light grey, but becomes a darker grey where organic material is present. It has a high plasticity and changes volume significantly with changes in moisture. When very dry, this soil shrinks, cracks and crumbles easily. When wet, it swells, heaves and becomes sticky and chalky. You can imagine how challenging it is to build houses, buildings, streets and yes, even tennis courts on top of this unstable soil.

In our normal scope of operation, we install our own stone base material with laser-controlled equipment but we do not get involved with the site preparation portion of the project. Engineers and grading contractors who work daily in a localized region generally know the best way to prepare a stable, compacted subgrade. Most of the time the owner already has the area prepared or has contracted with someone to do the work.

Over the years we have seen both good and bad results with projects built on this poor soil. The pictures show both extremes on courts that are only a few miles apart and built on the same type of material. The good courts were built nine years ago and still have no structural cracks. The bad courts, built only four years ago and prepared by a different grading contractor, began to deteriorate within the first two years. The picture shows an area that heaved around five inches and also displaced horizontally the same distance.

So how do you build a stable pad on this material?

I asked a reputable grading contractor (the one who built the pad under the good courts) to share some of the ways that he has had success over the years. He said that for most road and parking lot projects, lime stabilization is the preferred method. This involves undercutting to remove organic material and then blending lime into the remaining material to a specified depth before compaction. If this is done properly, the result is a very hard, stable base that is not significantly affected by moisture. This process requires a lot of water in order to make the lime react and set up properly. It must also be blended properly and fully compacted. Otherwise, the material will not be able to remain stable in wet conditions.

The bad courts were built on a lime-stabilized site that was installed during a drought. The probable cause for failure is the lack of sufficient water during installation. As the climate changed and the soil became saturated, it swelled and caused the distortion in the court surface.

Another acceptable way to prepare a stable pad is to undercut the bad material to a specified depth (usually 12-24”) and replace it with sandy clay. This is done frequently with smaller pads for homes, parking lots and tennis courts. The good courts were built on a site prepared in this way. The clay seems to serve as a cushion to prevent movement in the poor soil below from affecting the stone base and asphalt. Also, at a deeper level the poor soil moisture content will remain a little more uniform, keeping it from changing volume.

One other very important component in the site preparation with both methods is the installation of a French drain around the perimeter of the pad. The drain can be helpful in two ways. First, it drains off any water that is present in the pad. (This is especially important when red clay is used because the undercut area essentially becomes a pond and the clay will be soft when it is saturated.) Second, it prevents moisture from getting into the pad from the perimeter. This is very beneficial because it helps to keep the moisture content in the pad material and the soil below at a consistent level, thus keeping it from swelling or shrinking.

Post tension concrete is being used also, in recent years, on some building pads in this area to help minimize the cracking caused by soil instability but a certain amount of preparation is still required.

The most important factor seems to be having the experience and know-how to handle each project. The contractor I contacted feels comfortable in most any situation because he knows that when he does the work properly, based on what he has learned over the years, he can be confident that the subgrade will be suitable for the desired use.

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ASBA NEWS

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD
NEWSLINE is published four times per year by the American Sports Builders Association, a trade organization sponsored by membership dues. Opinions expressed in signed articles are those of the authors and not necessarily those of ASBA. Editorial contributions are requested. Deadlines: March 1, June 1, September 1 and December 1.

American Sports Builders Association, 8480 Baltimore National Pike, #307, Ellicott City, MD 21043, 866.501.ASBA (2722). www.sportsbuilders.org. ©ASBA, 2007. All rights reserved.

Officers
Chairman
Gerry Wright, CTCB (2007)
Court One
Youngsville, NC

President, Tennis Division
Gordy Pierce, CTCB (2007)
Cape & Island Tennis & Track
Pocasset, MA

President, Track Division
Sam Fisher, CTB (2008)
Fisher Tracks, Inc.
Boone, IA

President, Indoor Division
Robert Cohen, CTB (2008)
Robert Cohen Co., LLC
Albuquerque, NM

President, Fields Division
John Schedler, CTB (2007)
FieldTurf Tarkett
Highlands Ranch, CO

President, Professionals Division
Alex Levitsky, RA, PP (2008)
Global Sports & Tennis Design Group
Fair Haven, NJ

President, Associate/Affiliate Division
Randy Futty (2007)
Lee Tennis
Charlottesville, VA

Secretary/Treasurer
George Todd, Jr., CTCB (2007)
Welch Tennis Courts, Inc.
Sun City, FL

Past Chairman
David Marsden, CTCB (2007)
Boston Tennis Court Construction Co.
Hanover, MA

Directors
Mark Brogan, CTCB (B-2009)
Pro-Sport Construction, Inc.
Devon, PA

Robert Dougherty (AA-2008)
BASF Construction Chemicals
Chicago, IL

John Graham (AA-2007)
DecoTurf
Andover, MA

Aaron McWhorter (B -2007)
Sports Turf Company
Whitesburg, GA

David Nielsen (B-2007)
Leslie Coatings, Inc.
Indianapolis, IN

Pete Smith (B-2008)
The CourtSMITHs
Toledo, OH

Mike Vinton, CTCB (B-2008)
Vasco Sports Contractors
Massillon, OH

Legal Counsel
David H. Pettit, Esq.
Feil, Pettit & Williams, PLC
Charlottesville, VA

Executive Vice President
Carol T. Hogan, CAE

Association Coordinator
Cynthia M. Jordan

Financial Manager
Judi A. Mellendick

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BOARD HAPPENINGS
At our recent Winter Board Meeting at St. Pete Beach, the Board of Directors accomplished the following:

SCORECARD

Discussed and adopted a draft of the “Scorecard”, a board self-measurement tool developed by a committee consisting of Randy Futty (Lee Tennis, Charlottesville, VA), Mike Vinton, CTCB (Vasco Sports Contractors, Massillon, OH) and John Graham (DecoTurf, Andover, MA). Quantifiable Association goals will be tracked every four months by our staff to provide timely feedback to the Board regarding its progress. The initial Scorecard was completed as of 1/31/07 and should prove a very useful tool for the Board as it continues to deal with an ever-expanding menu of Association issues. Thanks to the Committee for their good work.

INDUSTRY MERIT AWARD

Accepted a procedure developed by Awards Committee Chairman Mark Brogan, CTCB (Pro-Sport Construction, Inc, Devon, PA) to evaluate nominations for Industry Merit Awards.

MEMBERSHIP DEFINITIONS

Discussed current definitions of some of our membership categories, particularly the “Builder” category, and how our growing membership demographics, dues structure, etc., may need revisiting. This issue was given to the Membership Committee for further evaluation.

TRACK CERTIFICATION EXAM

Discussed and accepted recommendations, with modifications, from the Track Certification Committee to update the Track Certification Exam. The Tennis Certification Committee will perform a similar analysis of the Tennis Certification Exam and the Board will continue to monitor both exams with regard to the timing, need and budget impact of their revision.

RESEARCH

Carol Hogan presented a proposal by which technical research could be performed for the Association through research grants funded by the ASBA. Discussion ensued as to whether it was appropriate or feasible for the ASBA to support research of this nature. Division Presidents were directed to poll their members to determine if this type of work might prove a valuable benefit to our members.

TIA PARTNERSHIP

Accepted a proposal presented by Marketing Committee Chair, John Welborn (Lee Tennis, Charlottesville, VA) whereby the ASBA would partner with the Tennis Industry Association. This partnership would not cost the ASBA any additional funds but would make available to our members an opportunity to participate in many of the services that TIA provides at a reduced or no cost, depending on the level of participation desired by the member. This partnership should not only improve the visibility of the ASBA, but also send a clear message of ASBA’s support for the growth of tennis.

MARKETING

Based on feedback from members at the Board Meeting luncheon, and supported by recommendations from the Marketing Committee, it was decided that a focus be placed on improving the ASBA website to make it more user friendly and visible for our members and other end users. A committee consisting of John Welborn, John Graham and Matt Strom (Leslie Coatings, Inc. Indianapolis, IN) agreed to work with our web host Lee Harris on this project.

TECHNICAL MEETING

As this is the showcase of our Association, much time was spent on assembling program content and speakers for our next Technical Meeting in Austin, TX, based on feedback from members, input from Division Presidents and others. Much discussion also took place regarding ways to make your Technical Meeting investment even more valuable. We hope that you like the changes!

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Can We "Quote" You?
What’s better than advertising? How about free advertising? If you agree to be contacted as a source for ASBA’s technical articles, it could mean additional promotion and exposure for your company and for you personally.

Here’s the way it works. ASBA supplies articles on technical topics to a number of industry-related trade publications. These articles deal with issues involving tracks, tennis courts, sports fields and indoor facilities, as well as various ancillary topics pertaining to these. We write our articles by interviewing our members – those who have volunteered to be interviewed, that is. Questions are sent out by e-mail, along with a deadline for response.

Once all members have responded, our staff writes the articles, using the input and expert opinions of our members in direct quotes. Those quotes list our members not just by name, but using the name and location of their company. Those articles are read by a huge buying public – club managers, athletic directors, coaches, facility managers, parks and recreation department officials, and more.

Want to participate? We’d love to have you! Simply send an e-mail to the staff member who writes our articles, Mary Helen Sprecher, at mhsprecher@verizon.net. Let her know which topics you prefer to be contacted about: tracks, tennis courts, sports fields, or indoor facilities (or any combination of those) and she will add you to the appropriate list. If you have previously added your name to the list, there is no need to do so again unless your e-mail address has changed.

We look forward to hearing from you!

ARTICLES, PLACEMENTS AND MENTIONS - 2006

Tennis
“Expanding Horizons,” Racquet Sports Industry, March 2006
“Fix the Cracks,” Racquet Sports Industry, March 2006
“Keep It Clean,” Racquet Sports Industry, March 2006
“Class Acts,” Racquet Sports Industry, March 2006
“The Good Stuff,” Racquet Sports Industry, April 2006
“Private Retreats,” Racquet Sports Industry, May 2006
“Must-Have Court Construction Manual Released,” Tennis Week, June 2006
“ASBA, USTA Release Tennis Courts Construction Manual,” Racquet Sports Industry, June 2006
Moving Release in “Short Sets,” Racquet Sports Industry, June 2006
“ASBA Sets December Technical Meeting,” Racquet Sports Industry, June 2006
“A Class Room,” Racquet Sports Industry, September/October 2006
”ASBA Technical Meeting Set for Daytona Beach,” Racquet Sports Industry, September/October 2006

Track
“Water on Tracks, Part I,” American Track & Field, Winter 2005
“Water on Tracks, Part II,” American Track & Field, Spring 2006
“Field Events for Multi-Sport Facilities,” Submitted for American Track & Field, January 2006
“Track Resurfacing,” American Track & Field, Summer 2006
”Ghosting on Tracks,” American Track & Field, Resource Guide 2006 (August)
“200-Meter Tracks,” Submitted for American Track & Field, Fall 2006

Turf
“Synthetic Field System Testing,” SportsField Management, April 2006
“Where the Field Meets the Track,” SportsField Management, July 2006

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MEMBER NEWS

MemberlineEditor’s Note: Information contained in MembeLine is submitted by members and published without verification. Its publication does not constitute an endorsement.

3rd Generation Righter Joins Nova Sports U.S.A. Inc.
Nova Sports USA, Milford, MA, has proudly announced that Jacob Righter has joined the Company as Sales and Marketing Specialist. Jacob recently received a Bachelor of Science degree from The University of Iowa studying Communications, Business and Sociology. Mr. Righter comes to Nova with two years of sales and marketing experience working with Nike Inc. of Beaverton, Oregon. In that position, he called on building contractors in eastern Iowa. Jacob has also spent the last seven summers working in Nova’s acrylic manufacturing plant and as a customer service assistant. In his new job, he will be in charge of developing new accounts and providing customer support. Jacob is a third generation Righter at Nova Sports USA, and joins his father Rob and Uncle Bill.

FieldTurf and Atlas Track & Tennis Announce Track Surfacing Partnership
FieldTurf (Montreal, Canada) and Atlas Track & Tennis (Tualatin, OR) have announced an alliance for the production and sale of a new track surfacing product, Atlas Resisport. Under this arrangement, Atlas will continue to do a significant amount of business in the western states, while FieldTurf concentrates on track surfacing in the eastern U.S. Atlas Resisport will provide the only third-party insured warranty in the track surfacing industry.

Lee Tennis Introduces New Tennis Surfacing Option
Lee Tennis (Charlottesville, VA) has introduced a new surfacing option called ClayTech. ClayTech’s core component, a polypropylene membrane, has been used for years in the European tennis market. This membrane is paired up with Har-Tru’s clay product to create a tennis surface that can be installed over an asphalt or concrete base. ClayTech comes in two colors – red and Har-Tru green. In place, it resembles the look and feel of a Har-Tru clay court, providing slide with minimal maintenance, similar to that required by an acrylic court. Lee Tennis is the sole U.S. distributor for ClayTech, a FieldTurf Tarkett product.

Philadelphia’s Arthur Ashe Youth Tennis & Education Named International Public Tennis Facility of the Year
Arthur Ashe Youth Tennis and Education in Philadelphia has been selected as Public Facility/Organization of the Year by the Professional Tennis Registry (PTR). Arthur Ashe Youth Tennis and Education (www.ashetennis.org) founded in 1952 is a national model for public youth tennis and education enrichment programs, combining tennis instruction, fitness, health, nutrition training, tutoring, computer science, library services and a nationally acclaimed life skills curriculum. Its $12.5 million center includes eight indoor DecoTurf Courts (DecoTurf, Andover, MA), seven outdoor DecoColor courts and an outdoor stadium with a DecoTurf surface. All sixteen courts were surfaced by Sportsline, Inc. (Villanova, PA).

PTR Partners with DecoTurf
Professional Tennis Registry (PTR) has announced a partnership agreement with DecoTurf (Andover, MA). The five-year sponsorship began in January 2007 and will provide PTR members an incentive to choose to play on DecoTurf’s multilayer tennis court systems.

Lee Tennis Teams Up with José Higueras
Lee Tennis (Charlottesville, VA) has formed a year long partnership with José Higueras, world class coach from Palm Springs, California, to promote the benefits of playing tennis on clay courts.

FieldTurf Tarkett Surface Debuts at Princeton
FieldTurf Tarkett’s (Montreal, PQ) new LeMonde track surface will be installed for the first time at Princeton University’s Weaver Track & Field Stadium. The LeMonde installation will include the long jump and pole vault runways. Work is expected to be completed by the time Princeton hosts both the Ivy League and ECAC track and field championships. Like other FieldTurf Tarkett products, LeMonde is backed by a fully insured third-party warranty.

Welch Tennis Announces 2007 Clay Court Seminar Schedule
Six clay court maintenance seminars are planned in 2007 by Welch Tennis Courts, Inc. (Sun City, FL). These one-day seminars include Har-Tru (Lee Tennis, Charlottesville, VA) maintenance and equipment for traditional overhead-irrigated fast dry courts as well as subsurface HydroGrid or HydroCourt installations. Emphasis is given to solving court maintenance problems and recent innovations in court care. Seminars are scheduled:
May 4, 2007 – The Club at The Strand, Naples, FL
May 11, 2007 – Hunter’s Green Country Club, Tampa, FL
May 18, 2007 – North Palm Beach Country Club, N. Palm Beach, FL
October 5, 2007 – West Palm Beach, FL – site to be determined
October 12, 2007 – Jacksonville, FL – site to be determined
October 19, 2007 – Naples/Fort Myers, FL – site to be determined
For information, call Deb Carlson at Welch Tennis, 800.282.4415.

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New Members

The following companies have joined the ASBA or renewed their membership since the last NEWSLINE. Please add their names to the appropriate section of your Membership Directory.

Athletic Fields, LLC (B)
1400 McKnight Street
Humboldt, TN 38343
731.824.4763
E-mail: athleticfieldstn@hotmail.com
www.athleticfields.org
Jason Griffitts, Director of Operations

California Surfacing (B)
4457 Oak Lane
Claremont, CA 91711
909.621.2195
E-mail: RSHottel@verizon.net
www.californiasurfacing.com
Rich Hottel, Owner

Coastal Plains Sales & Service (B)
11603 N. Weidner Road
San Antonio, TX 78233
210.656.9326
E-mail: cpss@sc2000.net
www.coastalplains.net
Brad Burke, President

LA Turf, Inc. (B)
468 N. Camden Dr., #200
Beverly Hills, CA 90210
310.860.7715
E-mail: peter@laturf.com
www.laturf.com
Peter Marine, President

Pro Grass, LLC (B)
960 Penn Ave., 8th Floor
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
412.434.6003
www.prograssturf.com
Tom Evans, General Manager

Professional Turf Products (AA)
207 Orchard Ave.
Belle Vernon, PA 15012
866.726.3326
E-mail: info@proturfproducts.com
www.proturfproducts.com
Paul DiBattista, Sales Manager

Protrak, Inc. (AA)
7036 Greenbank Road
Middle River, MD 21220
410.340.5683
E-mail: iseddinger@comcast.net
www.protrakstriping.com
Irv Eddinger, President

Ross SportField Professionals (B)
4232 Cliff Road
Birmingham, AL 35222
205.591.8777
E-mail: ross@fieldbuilder.com
www.fieldbuilder.com
Ross Tortorigi, President

Tennis Planning Consultants (P)
3501 W. Alabama, #200
Houston, TX 77027
713.572.2541
www.tennisplanningconsultants.com
Jack Kamrath, President

Texas Sports Builders, Inc. (B)
821 SW Alsbury, Suite C
Burleson, TX 76028
817.447.9988
E-mail: andy@txbsports.com
Andrew Lorimer, Vice President

Visionaire Lighting (AA)
19645 Rancho Way
Rancho Dominguez, CA 90220
310.512.6480
E-mail: dfried@visionairelighting.com
www.visionairelighting.com
David Fried, Sales Manager - Sports Lighting Div.

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Certification Corner
Congratulations to the following member of ASBA who has become newly certified since the last issue of NEWSLINE:

Hector Puentes, CTB
Texas Sports Builders, Inc.

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CALENDAR

Nov 28 – Dec 1, 2007 Athletic Business Conference, Orange County Convention Center, Orlando, FL. For more information, www.athleticbusiness.com/conference.

December 2-4, 2007 ASBA Technical Meeting, Hyatt Regency Austin, Austin, TX. For information 866.501.ASBA (2722) or www.sportsbuilders.org.

January 16-20, 2008 SportsTurf Managers Association Conference, Phoenix Civic Plaza Convention Center, Phoenix, AZ. For information www.sportsturfmanager.org.

February 21-25, 2008 ASBA Winter Meeting, Hilton El Conquistador, Tucson, AZ. For information 866.501.ASBA (2722) or www.sportsbuilders.org.

December 7-9, 2008 ASBA Technical Meeting, Astor Crowne Plaza, New Orleans, LA. For information 866.501.ASBA (2722) or www.sportsbuilders.org.

December 5-7, 2009 ASBA Technical Meeting, Hyatt Regency Savannah, Savannah, GA. For information 866.501.ASBA (2722) or www.sportsbuilders.org.

December 5-7, 2010 ASBA Technical Meeting, Marriott Sawgrass, Ponte Vedra Beach, FL. For information 866.501.ASBA (2722) or www.sportsbuilders.org.

Note: Updated information on ASBA meetings can often be found on the website; please contact www.sportsbuilders.org

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FYI

Turf Shoes Prevent Injury
Footwear designed specifically for playing soccer and football on artificial turf can reduce the risk of stress fracture according to findings presented last June at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). But, although the researchers found that turf shoes had no negative effect on the time to complete an agility course, athletes still expressed a definite preference for more traditional cleated footwear.

“You’re going to have a hard time getting soccer players to play in a turf shoe,” said Robin M. Queen, PhD, director of Krzyzewski Human Performance Laboratory (K-Lab) at Duke, who presented her group’s findings at the ACSM meeting.

Soccer players tend to feel that turf shoes, which feature an outsole patterned with small multidirectional rubber studs for improved traction on slick surfaces, do not grip as well during cutting as cleated shoes, Queen said.

Source: BioMechanics, September 2006

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Protecting Customer and Employee Data
Given the number of well-publicized breaches of data security at major corporations, what are you doing to protect your customer and employee data? With fewer resources, small businesses often are more at risk than their larger counterparts and are disproportionately affected when customer and employee data is compromised.

But, help is on the way! The Council of Better Business Bureaus, Arlington, Virginia, in cooperation with Privacy & American Business, Hackensack, New Jersey, has launched a nationwide education initiative to help businesses protect themselves. The program, called “Security & Privacy Made Simpler” includes a free, easy-to-use security and privacy toolkit focused on customer data protection. An employee toolkit is in the works. Eventually a downloadable Webinar is planned.

According to Steve Cole, president and CEO of the Council, “What we’re really trying to do here is make an intimidating issue much more manageable. It’s human nature that if something seems complex or complicated, we tend to put it aside and think we’ll deal with it later.

The educational materials, accessible at www.bbb.org/securityandprivacy, emphasize the importance of a comprehensive security and privacy plan and take both an offline and online security approach using simple steps such as shredding documents, spot checking employees’ backgrounds, avoiding phishing e-mails, etc.

Source: Associations Now, August 2006

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Speaking of Phishing
Wondering if that e-mail is a phishing scam? Want to do your part to stop phishing? The web has several important resources where you can research suspicious e-mails and report phishing scams.

US-CERT (The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team), a part of the Department of Homeland Security, offers publications designed to help you report phishing scams, reduce spam, avoid viruses and generally protect yourself from online dangers. Go to www.us-cert.gov and click on “Publications.” To do your part by reporting phishing, go to www.us-cert.gov/nav/report_phishing.html.

The Anti-Phishing Working Group (APWG), sponsored by the American Bankers Association among others, is a volunteer organization which is building a repository of phishing scam e-mails. You can search its phishing archive to determine whether a particular e-mail is a scam or report a possible phishing e-mail you receive. Go to www.antiphishing.org for information.

One of the most extensive archives of phishing scams is found in the UK. Check out www.millersmiles.co.uk to search its archives for scam reports.

Play it safe. According to US-CERT, at a minimum, you should:

Filter spam.

Don’t trust unsolicited email.

Treat e-mail attachments with caution.

Don’t click links in e-mail messages.

Install anti-virus software and keep it up to date.

Install a personal firewall and keep it up to date.

Configure your email client for security.

Approved OSHA Training Courses in English and Spanish Available Online

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has approved online safety training courses available through OSHA Pros, Inc. A 10-hour Construction Course in Spanish is available as is a 30-hour General Industry Course in English. For details on these and more online courses, visit www.osha-pros.com.

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Eye Q’s and Views
Studies have found that the majority of people who work at a computer experience some eye or vision problems, according to Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Inc. Eye stress and strain may be caused by a combination of individual vision problems, improper viewing habits and poor environmental conditions such as glare, improper workstation set up, a dirty screen, poor lighting or a poor viewing angle. The good news is that many potential problems can be reduced by preventative habits:

Take breaks when working at the computer. Remember the 20/20/20 rule. Take a 20-second break every 20 minutes. Focus your eyes on something 20 feet away. Our eyes were not made to see at a close distance for hours at a time without a break.
For maximum comfort, the center of the computer screen should be 5”- 9” below your eye level. You should be looking just over the top of the monitor.
Balance brightness between the computer display and the surrounding illumination. If your screen background is black or dark, dim the lights down to about one-third of what you would consider normal. If you use a white or light background screen, then use brighter room lighting.
Place whatever you look at most often right in front of you. This applies to both your display screen and to documents you are working on.

For more information, take the computer ergonomics quiz at www.acuvue.com.

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Tennis in the Park Update
According to Peggy Beard, CTCB (Ret.), Chairman of USTA’s Technical Committee 128 applications have been received in the first round of this year’s Tennis in the Parks (TIP) grant program. Current grant applications request $2.9m in grants to fund $31m dollars of improvements, of which $25m is for new construction and reconstruction. Applications come from 43 states and from Puerto Rico. Approximately $500,000 in grants will be awarded in the first round. Often applicants receive grant money from their local Sections, whether or not they receive a TIP grant. Every grant applicant will receive a copy of Tennis Courts: A Construction and Maintenance Manual.

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Email: info@sportsbuilders.org