Volume 43, July 2010


July 2010

Welcome to the latest innovation from ASBA - NEWSLINE on-line!

From the Chair
Sam Fisher, CTB

Invest in ASBA

Success is rarely an accident. No matter what field we are in, success is generally a result of a combination of motivation and aptitude. We are willing to “do what it takes” to achieve our end result, if we are motivated. Read more...

Meetings
Robert Stevenson to Keynote at December Technical Meeting
Internationally-recognized speaker Robert Stevenson, and author of the best-selling book “How to Soar Like an Eagle in a World Full of Turkeys,” will be the keynote speaker at the upcoming ASBA Technical Meeting, December 5. Stevenson has shared the podium with such renowned speakers as Colin Powell, General Norman Schwartzkopf and Tom Peters; and has worked with sports construction teams, including those involved, Read more...

Management Ideas for Surviving a Recession
Robert Stevenson, the keynote speaker at ASBA's upcoming Technical Meeting in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla, offers some thoughts on surviving a recession.
Read more...

If You Want to Succeed, Start Focusing
The great companies today are staying calm, keeping a clear head and then focusing their efforts on profitability, increasing cash flow and making their customers their number one concern. Discipline becomes the rule, and simplifying what they do best, the goal. Many companies lose sight of their core business. They get busy re-organizing or re-restructuring when they should be busy at under-promising and over-delivering in everything they do.
Read more...

Sponsorship Opportunities for 2010-2011
Earlier this summer, we launched the 2010-2011 Sponsorship Packages, with many new benefits. These packages give suppliers the opportunity to stay in front of their customers for the entire year – not just one meeting. We are still offering sponsorships for the Technical Meeting but we are now offering a complete sponsorship package that includes ASBA membership dues, sponsorships at both the Technical Meeting and Winter Meeting, as well as advertising on our website and our Annual Membership Directory. One Stop Shopping!
Read more...

Coming Soon ... New ASBA Web Site
As previously reported, the ASBA Board has approved resources for a complete re-design of ASBA’s website. ASBA Staff has been working very closely with a Website Task Force and a designer to reconstruct the site. Efforts are on-schedule, with an expected launch-date of late August-early September.
Read more...

Wheelchair Athletics
What's separating the kid in a wheelchair from his or her able-bodied peers who are playing sports? It might be a lot more than the fence around the tennis court, the sidelines of the field, or the stands in the stadium. Fortunately, members of the ASBA are working along with facility managers, schools and towns to help break down those barriers.
Read more...

Member News

ASBA Welcomes New Members
ASBA welcomes nine new companies that have joined the association since the last newsletter.t.
Read more...

Call for Articles: Seeking Submissions to Newsline
Would you like to contribute to a future issue of Newsline? Articles to be submitted to Newsline should address topics that are of interest to the general membership.
Read more...

Memberline
latest news from ASBA members.
Read more...

May We Quote You?
One of ASBA's most important programs is its technical articles, which are written for trade magazines in various segments of the industry, including tennis, track, indoor and fields facilities.
Read more...

Calendar of Events
Important Dates
Mark your calendar for the ASBA Technical Meeting. Read more...


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From the Chair
Sam Fisher, CTB

Invest in ASBA

Success is rarely an accident. No matter what field we are in, success is generally a result of a combination of motivation and aptitude. We are willing to “do what it takes” to achieve our end result, if we are motivated.

Sometimes this motivation comes simply from the level of expectation for a good result. This is usually derived from aptitude. We feel that we are good at what we do so we should be able to attain a good result. What happens, though, if we are deficient in the aptitude or, more importantly, the motivation?

Sometimes the “thank yous” don’t seem to cut it when you are trying to motivate those around you. A thank you from high up just may not give you the motivation you need. It has been estimated that nearly 50% of employees who leave a work place, do so because they do not feel appreciated. Research has also shown that 88% of workers report that the work they do goes unacknowledged.

Tip the scales in your company. Everyone (from the top down) needs to feel valued. Good incentives can increase productivity.

Set goals for the season and plan on bringing those employees to ASBA’s Technical Meeting this year in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, December 4-7, 2010. This next Winter Meeting is at Atlantis! What better incentive and show of appreciation than a trip to Atlantis!

I think all of us are feeling swamped right now. We are in a seasonal business and it seems to be feast or famine. Gasoline cards, gift certificates to restaurants, etc. all work as incentives during these hectic installation times. Remember that part of every team is family. Family has a way of putting a perspective on life. The end rewards are not about the owner, the CEO, or the manager. It has everything to do though with “the team.”

I think we have all heard the expression, “There is no success without succession.” I believe every person in a company would like to be promoted and, probably more importantly, better compensated. There is no ability to move up until there is someone in place to do your current job or level of responsibility.

In whom are you investing?

See you in December at our Technical Meeting and look forward to seeing each and every one of you in Atlantis!

Sam Fisher, CTB
ASBA Chairman

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MEETINGS

Robert Stevenson to Keynote at December Technical Meeting

Internationally-recognized speaker Robert Stevenson, and author of the best-selling book “How to Soar Like an Eagle in a World Full of Turkeys,” will be the keynote speaker at the upcoming ASBA Technical Meeting, December 5. Stevenson has shared the podium with such renowned speakers as Colin Powell, General Norman Schwartzkopf and Tom Peters; and has worked with sports construction teams, including those involved

in building Jacksonville Municipal Stadium, home of the NFL’s Jacksonville Jaguars. Stevenson knows how to deal with the risks, competition and ever-changing technology in the business arena.

The Technical Meeting, which will be held December 4-7, is one of the best chances to catch up on valuable industry contacts and information, prepare for the season ahead and get lots of ideas on how to diversify your business, make money in down-time, and specialize your learning by attending special sessions for tennis, track, indoor and fields, as well as design professionals and general industry knowledge. There are board meetings, division meetings, meetings of the certified builders (as well as the administration of the certification exam itself), presentation of awards and more. Plus, there are the ASBA fun favorites, including golf and tennis tournaments, opportunities for nightlife, fishing and plenty of other opportunities to relax and unwind with colleagues, competitors and friends new and old.

You won't want to miss a moment of this meeting, so mark the dates, December 4-7, on your calendar now. More information, included an expanded program listing all events, will be mailed automatically to all members. Others may contact the Association and ask to be put on the list, at 866-501-ASBA (2722) or 410-730-9595. The ASBA also may be reached electronically via its website: www.sportsbuilders.org, or by e-mail at info@sportsbuilders.org (where information on the meeting will also be posted as soon as it becomes available.)

ASBA thanks Stockmeier Urethanes USA, Inc. for its sponsorship of this year’s Keynote Speaker, Robert Stevenson.

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Management Ideas for Surviving a Recession
by Robert Stevenson

  • Forget the “good ole days,” they’re gone. Start looking for small victories and recognize them.

  • Keep smiling no matter what. Always know your people are taking their lead from you.

  • Blame nobody. Blame is not an achievement – identifying a problem is.

  • Come to work earlier and stay later.

  • Always be asking your people, “What do you think,” and then listen.

  • The devil is in the details, so go find the devil.

  • Always be positive – if you have to say something negative – Don’t !

  • Keep saying “This too will pass,” and then help it pass.

  • Prospect, prospect, prospect for new clients.

  • Network, network, network all the time. Out of sight … is out of mind.

  • Stay visible in your management. Let them see you out and about – working it.

  • Stay in touch with clients – a lot!

  • Simplify all procedures and paperwork.

  • Eliminate excess.

  • Raise all levels of customer satisfaction.

  • Stay on top of the mistakes, errors, complaints, miscues and gripes.

  • Ask young people their opinion. They won’t say … “That’s the way we’ve always done it.”

  • Develop strong vendor relationships.

  • Get familiar with everyone in your company / department. Camaraderie is powerful.

  • Respect and appreciate your people. Public recognition is extremely motivating.

  • Receive all customer complaints with thanks and send gifts.

  • Address failures as a learning experience and move on. “Fail Forward Fast”

  • Be empathetic. Kindness is free, so share it.

  • Avoid negative people.

  • Keep asking your people … What do we do around here that is stupid, ridiculous, a waste of time or non-productive, and then quit doing it/them … now!

“Excellence can be obtained if you:
... care more than others think is wise;
... risk more than others think is safe;
... dream more than others think is practical;
... expect more than others think is possible.” Anon.

Rob Stevenson will be the keynote speaker at ASBA’s Technical Meeting, in Ponte Vedra Beach Florida. He will be speaking on “How the Best Get Better” on December 5, 2010.

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If You Want to Succeed, Start Focusing
by Robert Stevenson

The great companies today are staying calm, keeping a clear head and then focusing their efforts on profitability, increasing cash flow and making their customers their number one concern. Discipline becomes the rule, and simplifying what they do best, the goal. Many companies lose sight of their core business. They get busy re-organizing or re-restructuring when they should be busy at under-promising and over-delivering in everything they do. Never confuse activity with accomplishment. A gerbil on a running wheel is extremely active, but is going nowhere.

Align your entire company or organization around a single priority. Please don’t get caught up in those fancy, smart sounding business phrases of identifying your value-chain, brand development, image make-over, contrast methodology, or reorganization criteria, just to name a few. Get down to the simple questions of …

What is it that we do best ? … What made us successful ?

Everyone in your company needs to know what it is that you are striving to deliver to the end customer. It might be saying, “we will be making the very best sandwich, with the freshest ingredients, in shortest amount of time, following the best sanitary policies in our industry” or “we will deliver your freight on time, every time, with no damage.”

If you don’t know where to focus, then start by identifying all customer complaints and look for the most common cause of those complaints. Years ago I wrote …

The day you forget you are in business for the customer, is the day you start going out of business.

Focus, direct, fixate … preoccupy your company obsessively on your defined target and make sure EVERYONE knows what it is and how they are to be held accountable. By the way, the same holds true for personal improvement.

Focus your efforts on a single priority and see it through. You will be amazed how many other things you do will also improve.

Rob Stevenson will be the keynote speaker at ASBA’s Technical Meeting, in Ponte Vedra Beach Florida. He will be speaking on “How the Best Get Better” on December 5, 2010.

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Sponsorship Opportunities for 2010-2011

Increasing Your E-Marketing Efforts?

Launching a New Product ?

Want to Make a SPLASH in the Industry?


Earlier this summer, we launched the 2010-2011 Sponsorship Packages, with many new benefits. These packages give suppliers the opportunity to stay in front of their customers for the entire year – not just one meeting. We are still offering sponsorships for the Technical Meeting but we are now offering a complete sponsorship package that includes ASBA membership dues, sponsorships at both the Technical Meeting and Winter Meeting, as well as advertising on our website and our Annual Membership Directory. One Stop Shopping!

Sponsorship packages include an online logo (with a direct link to your corporate website) from the main page of ASBA’s website. With the launch of ASBA’s new website scheduled for late summer, don’t miss this opportunity. Make sure your company benefits from the increased traffic that this new site will generate (online advertising is only available through the sponsorship packages).

Now is the time to showcase products or services to builders, professionals and other members of the tennis court, running track, field and indoor sports flooring industries through multiple venues and events.

Click here for more information.

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Coming Soon ... New ASBA Web Site

As previously reported, the ASBA Board has approved resources for a complete re-design of ASBA’s website.

ASBA Staff has been working very closely with a Website Task Force and a designer to reconstruct the site. Efforts are on-schedule, with an expected launch-date of late August-early September.

The new site will make it easier for prospective buyers to find a builder, designer or supplier; submit bid documents; and locate technical guidelines and information on the ASBA site. Members should pay close attention to their dues invoices when they are sent out later this summer to make sure that contact information is complete and accurate, as this will be the information available to prospective buyers via the website search functions.

The site will feature online ads/corporate logos with clickable links, for companies who participate in ASBA’s Sponsorship Packages.

Watch for more information later this summer.

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Wheelchair Athletics
by Mary Helen Sprecher

What's separating the kid in a wheelchair from his or her able-bodied peers who are playing sports? It might be a lot more than the fence around the tennis court, the sidelines of the field, or the stands in the stadium. Fortunately, members of the ASBA are working along with facility managers, schools and towns to help break down those barriers.

Members and others have contacted the association to describe the work they have done on athletic facility projects designed for inclusion and accessibility, to allow greater numbers of children to participate in sports. It's all a part of understanding the needs of the kids -- and in a huge part, understanding how much that need is growing. And while the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) certainly plays a part in the design of many facilities, its work can only do so much to include physically challenged athletes.

"The number of people with disabilities in the United States is in the millions," says Jeremiah Yolkut of the USTA's Competitive Play and Technical Programs division. "The number-one challenge -- what we really want to do -- is get those people involved at the grassroots level."

Making the U.S. (More) Open
If you've built or resurfaced a tennis court, it's a good bet that at one time or another, a wheelchair player has used it. Wheelchair tennis uses a standard 60' x 120' court; in general, the differences come in the form of rules. (Wheelchair tennis allows the ball to bounce twice, and several rules govern how the players may move in the chair, or move the chair around the court, but beyond that, the rules of the game are remarkably similar). What makes a court a wheelchair-friendly facility is the way it is appointed.

Opening up tennis courts to wheelchair-bound players, says Yolkut, starts with opening up the gates themselves. "At tennis centers that are being built now, things are much more accessible. The openings that allow players to get on the court are wider. While it's standard for many facilities to have 42" wide gates, you want to have a wider opening for wheelchair players because of what we call the camber, or the angle in the wheels that you'll see in an athletic wheelchair. You're much more likely to go to a 48" wide opening because that means you don't have to take a wheel off the chair to get it through the gate."

While not all players are self-conscious about having to get out of a wheelchair and 'scoot through' the gate, then reassemble the chair inside (or have it passed over the fence to them), most would rather have one less barrier. Making it easy, notes Yolkut, means the player has a more enjoyable experience. Making it difficult can leave a bad taste in a player's mouth, "and you don't want people leaving the sport and thinking, 'They don't seem to want to make this easy for me, so why should I bother to play?'"

Amenities and accessories should be chosen with wheelchair players in mind, he adds. Umpire chairs, if movable, allow players to change sides without having to circumvent the entire court and enter through another gate. Ditto any benches or other equipment that sits between the sidelines and the fence.

Wheelchair tennis is played on all surfaces, Yolkut notes. (If a Grand Slam is played by able-bodied players on one surface, it's played by wheelchair athletes as well.)

" With that said, a hard court always seems to be the surface of choice for wheelchair tennis because there's less friction between the tire and the court and the player can move a little faster. Wheelchair players can play on other surfaces, but you have to be a little stronger and have that much more endurance. The top players in the world want to play on grass. Clay is a little easier. There's a huge amount of research that's done in regard to wheelchair athletics, basically the same way there is research on shoe/surface interactions."

Something that might surprise members? The QuickStart Tennis format, with its shorter courts and softer balls, is being applied to those learning wheelchair tennis as well. Those who are learning not only the game of tennis, but getting familiar with being in a wheelchair as a whole, tend to find it a rewarding and fun experience, and have an easier time mastering the skills.

"It lends itself to that as much as for any other introductory player," says Yolkut. "It's still teaching the fundamentals, like learning ground strokes, and getting comfortable hitting the ball. "It slows the game down and teaches people to build technique."

Because wheelchair tennis games and tournaments often attract spectators who also have mobility limitations, says Yolkut, the USTA tends to pick out tournament facilities that are more attractive to everyone. Facilities with elevators, without steep ramps, with seating that allows wheelchair-bound (or otherwise mobility-impaired) individuals to move around easily, and so forth, all make for a good experience.

The biggest challenge, he adds, remains identifying and reaching wheelchair tennis players. The USTA has developed manuals and DVDs on wheelchair tennis, and sponsors tournaments around the country, but it's the average players who are really needed.

"If the USTA's membership is 740,000, and of those, the number of individuals who identify themselves as wheelchair tennis players is in the 700-range, we know we're missing out on people. We're just talking about people who want to casually play, who want some exercise and some fun. If we only focus on the elite, then we're missing those people who are just casually playing."

Leveling the Playing Field (Really)
Sometimes, the needs of physically impaired individuals are overlooked because they're a small percentage of the population. That was not the case in the Cotting School in Lexington, Massachusetts. The school is specifically for students with special needs. Of its approximately 120 students, 40% have wheelchairs or walkers, according to president David Manzo.

" We have a fully accessible campus of 14 acres, but when I arrived, we had one hurdle left: how do you get kids in wheelchairs and walkers to play outside on a sports field? We have children in all kinds of wheelchairs, including some power chairs, which are really heavy. It just can't be done without a synthetic surface."

Cotting worked with Boston-based ASBA member Stantec Sport, which studied the students' needs and came up with a game plan for a field that would work.

"Our response was to test a number of different types of synthetic turf , which is accessible," said Stantec's Patrick Maguire. "Grass is not. We settled on a surface that utilized a shorter carpet pile (to keep it standing upright) and filled it up much higher in the pile. This enabled much easier wheelchair access. We also made sure to remove all latex and rubber from the carpet and the infill. Instead of latex backing we used urethane and instead of crumb rubber we used thermoplastic elastomer (TPE)."

Polytan USA (Marietta, Georgia) was one of the suppliers who contributed to the project. Another ASBA member, RAD Sports (Rockland, Massachusetts) was the contractor. The finished field opened in September 2009 with an all-school soccer game. And that was just the beginning.

" We've been able to do Saturday morning soccer programs, so that children can play soccer on the field. These are things their typically developing peers are doing. Parents, grandparents, everyone, comes out and watches the kids play."

Manzo is pleased with the field which allows wheelchairs to roll easily, but still protects children who fall. The students are all medically fragile, he notes, so accidents on the playing field are a big concern. The field measures 100' x 125' which, as he notes, might be modest to some schools, "but for us, it's perfect."

These days, students are able to take part in a number of athletic facilities. Soccer can be played onsite, but come summer, Little League will take the field.

"We're going to have Challenger Little League starting up," Manzo says happily. "Our teams are going to be the Orioles, As, Dodgers and Cardinals. We don't have the Red Sox because obviously, every kid would want to be on the Red Sox. And we don't have the Yankees. Obviously."

Getting Athletes Rolling on the Right Track
High school athletic associations are reporting an increase in requests for accommodations for wheelchair-bound athletics. Although the National Federation of State High School Associations does not track data on wheelchair athlete participation in various programs, Assistant Director Becky Oakes says that several states "currently offer adaptive, wheelchair events within their state track and field championships." The states include Minnesota, Georgia, Alabama, Iowa and Washington.

Schools with wheelchair racing programs tend to offer at least one throwing event (shot put, javelin, etc.) as well (athletes are referred to as 'seated throwers'). Wheelchairs are generally secured to the ground or to an immobile object for the throwing events.

According to Gary Phillips, assistant executive director at the Georgia High School Association, GHSA partnered with the American Association of Adapted Sports Programs, which helped identify and develop programs that would serve wheelchair athletes. At present, says Phillips, wheelchair athletes compete in their own division in three track and field events, the 200m, 800m and the shot put.

"We thought some kids might be better suited for short races, and some for long races," said Phillips, "and we wanted the shot as a throwing event. We divide the shot into two divisions based on the students’ handicap."

Washington State offers not only track and field but cross country programs for wheelchair athletes, according to Teresa Fisher of the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association.

One state working to grow its programs is Maryland, according to Ned Sparks, Executive Director of the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association (MPSSA).

"All our school systems are required to have accommodations for students with disabilities, and many are going to have a track and field component," notes Sparks. "I would think that yes, it is one of those things that is going to be there in the future, and also that it's going to be one of those things that is just offered automatically, rather than having to have students ask for it."

One of Maryland's high school track and field athletes went on to medal at the Paralympics. Sparks notes that although Maryland has been one of the first states to allow wheelchair-bound athletes to share the track with their able-bodied counterparts, "I don't think we're going to be the last."

While high-level professional athletes can afford to be choosy about the surfaces they use, high schoolers generally don't have that option, and that goes for wheelchair athletes as well as runners. Sparks says Maryland hasn't researched the surface/wheelchair tire interaction (the sport is still in the developmental stages at most high schools), but hazards a guess that "maybe the harder the surface, the better."

According to Jim Stalford of Mondo USA (Tega Cay, South Carolina), "wheelchair track racers prefer the consistency of a vulcanized rubber surface. This allows them to have same traction on all areas of the surface and to minimize how far the wheels penetrate the surface, enabling them to push faster with less energy."

Other tips for those designing or setting up facilities for wheelchair athletes? Adequate warm-up areas. "These are hard to accommodate," Stalford notes. "It is best if there is a large open parking lot, road or warm-up track near the competition track for athletes to warm-up. The warm-up area also needs a safe and easy way pathway for the athletes to get to the competition area."

Then there are the aspects of competition that many people don't even know about, according to Matt Hale of HaleCon in Bridgewater, New Jersey. Having these, he notes, can mean all the difference between a facility that is not just accessible but welcoming.

"Something I believe is critical, yet often missed is adequate shade for temperature control," Hale notes. "Many individuals with spinal cord or brain injuries are extremely sensitive to temperature, particularly to heat. Some can have life-threatening heat reactions which can occur with little warning. Plan as much shade as possible. I would just stress that surface that throws off heat should be avoided. The more shade, the better."

Plan for athletes' needs both on and off the track or playing field, he adds. Of course, having water sources at or near the facility is a must, but so are some other things. "If possible, a cool-down area would be helpful, possibly an enclosed space attached to a bathroom facility, air-conditioned, with electric outlets and water. This space could not only provide emergency cooling, but also are a private area for suctioning. Many people with high spinal cord injuries have difficulty breathing, and often use ventilators to assist ventilation. At times, the airway can get blocked with secretions, thus creating an urgent need for suction. Proper suction would require a source for water and electric."

Other types of disabilities can also be accommodated, Stalford adds, with the right facilities. "Visually impaired runners prefer a high contrast track. A solid colored red or black track with white lines is best. Blind long and triple jumpers have difficulty with raised runways. It is best to have the runway even with the surrounding ground and plenty of room at the end of the sand box (no light poles, gutters, etc.). The sand should be even with the end of the box so that they can easily run through the back and not trip on the box or run into anything when they do run-throughs."

ADA legislation was an enormous help to wheelchair-bound individuals, but it's far from the end of the road. New laws are being enacted all the time. One that has the potential to impact all athletic programs in schools across the state of Maryland, says Ned Sparks, and which will take full effect in 2011, is the Fitness and Athletic Equity Law for Students with Disabilities. In short, it ensures that students with disabilities are provided equal opportunities to participate in physical education programs, and athletic activities in Maryland schools. The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Maryland State Department of Education will work with local school jurisdictions to improve policies and implement the new statute and improvements to adaptive physical education and interscholastic athletic participation.

While Sparks understands the necessity of accommodating wheelchair athletes, and believes that all students should be able to participate in athletics if they can, he also recognizes the difficulties that lie ahead for schools and athletic programs.

"This is a heck of a budget time, and to be mandating/adding sports at a time when a lot of cuts are being made -- that's difficult. It's difficult to launch new programs when you're trying to fight to keep the old ones."

Other states, which are not mandating as many new measures, find it easier to accommodate physically challenged students. For David Anderson, assistant executive director with the Iowa High School Athletic Association, "the only possible financial challenge is transportation."

As David Manzo notes, however, it's the end result that makes it all worthwhile.

"I was watching a 4-year-old on our new field," he says. "He just came to the U.S. from Haiti, and he is being adopted by a teacher from our school. I was standing there watching him playing soccer on that field. That was great. That was just so great to see."

Gary Phillips found that he was pleasantly surprised by the public's reaction to the wheelchair division of races.

"The first time (we had a track in which wheelchair athletes competed), I had anxiety, anticipation — I was wondering, 'How will the fans react?' We ran the 200 and the fans were cheering for the kids. They were great. Even when there’s a big distance between the kid who wins and the one who comes in last, the spectators stayed right there and cheered for everyone. We were able to ask all the kids in the race, 'Did you hear them cheering for you?' and they all said, 'Yes, sir, I heard that!' They were very happy."

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MEMBER NEWS

ASBA Welcomes New Members

ASBA welcomes the following new members who have joined since the last issue of our newsletter.

Arrow Concrete & Asphalt Specialties, Inc. (B)
9915 E Trent Ave.
Spokane Valley, WA 99206
509-922-7847
www.asphaltsupply.net
sales@asphaltsupply.net
Dave Lawless, President

Cushion Tennis Courts, LLC (B)
7753 NW Poplar Dr.
Redmond, OR 97756
541-550-0941
Tenniscourts4u@msn.com
Daniel Hanks, President

Evergreen Tennis Courts, Inc. (B)
2332 Fountain Drive
Loveland, CO 80538
970-663-7788
evergreentennis@aol.com
George Stahlin, President

Ewing Irrigation (S)
3441 E. Harbour Drive
Phoenix, AZ 85034
480-297-5860
csinacori@ewing1.com
www.ewing1.com
Chris Sinacori, Sports Field Specialist

JDC Construction Co. (B)
P.O. Box 1201
Wylie, TX 75098
972-442-1904
Jd.jdc@verizon.net
Jay Davis, President

Living Designs Group Architects (P)
122 A Dona Luz
Taos, NM 87571
575-751-9481
www.ldgtaos.com
dpatterson@ldgtaos.com
Douglas Patterson, Architect

National Insulation & GC Corp. (B)
50 Audrey Ave.
Oyster Bay, NY 11771
516-624-9711
grgass@aol.com
Steve Grgas, Vice President

O.C. Jones & Sons, Inc. (B)
1520 Fourth St.
Berkeley, CA 94710
510-526-3424
www.ocjones.com
calfaro@ocjones.com
Catrina Alfaro, Marketing Manager

Southern Athletics Design & Consultation, LLC (P)
1360 Deerwood Drive
Madison, GA 30650
706-557-7864
jwhite@southernathletics.net
www.southernathletics.net
James White, Owner

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Call for Articles: Seeking Submissions to Newsline

Articles to be submitted to Newsline should address topics that are of interest to the general membership. (Certainly, we realize that not all topics are relevant to everyone, so perhaps this might be of interest just to those who make post-tensioned concrete courts, or asphalt tennis courts in park and rec facilities, or latex tracks, or multi-purpose artificial turf fields, etc.)

They might concern, for example, ideas for solutions to common problems, new trends in construction or repair, problems being reported by consumers and how contractors are addressing them (or things they're trying in general in order to fix those problems). Sometimes, a contractor has developed a checklist for customers to use when examining their courts, tracks or fields on a periodic or seasonal basis; sometimes, a contractor wants to discuss an issue that seems to be troubling facilities in a specific geographical area, and to suggest some possible fixes, but to invite other builders to chime into the discussion, and so on. Sometimes, the writer wants to discuss the proper technique for installing equipment or supplies, and certainly, that is an important topic as well.

We ask members to try to steer clear of recommending brand-name products, and to use generic terms whenever possible. Length isn't always an issue because our Newsline is an online publication -- but we do ask that the writer try to be as concise as possible, since it keeps the reader interested. It is not required that you submit illustrations (photos, diagrams, etc.) with your article, but certainly, if you want to, ASBA's readers find them very helpful. (When submitting photos, please make sure they are as high a resolution as possible, since they show up much more clearly that way).

Whenever possible, articles should be submitted electronically, in a Word format. Please include your phone number and an email address (and let us know how to get in touch with you) in case we have any questions or need clarification on any points.

Certified Builders can obtain points by submitting articles for publication. Please review the recertification handbook for detailed information on recertification points.


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Memberline

The latest news from ASBA members.

Grand Sands All Season Beach Volleyball

Grand Sands All Season Beach Volleyball is the first indoor / outdoor sand facility in Ohio. The recently opened five outdoor courts are illuminated with the Courtsider XL system from LSI Industries. Using four fixtures per court with 750 watt pulse start metal halide lamps, the lighting system provides a maintained light level of 40 foot-candles. Mounted at 25’, the Courtsider XL fixtures uniformly light the courts with minimal spill light outside of the court boundaries.

Grand Sands All Season Beach Volleyball is the first indoor / outdoor sand facility in Ohio. The recently opened five outdoor courts are illuminated with the Courtsider XL system from LSI Industries. Using four fixtures per court with 750 watt pulse start metal halide lamps, the lighting system provides a maintained light level of 40 foot-candles. Mounted at 25’, the Courtsider XL fixtures uniformly light the courts with minimal spill light outside of the court boundaries.
 

Lee Tennis Court Products

Lee Tennis Court Products, the manufacturer of Har-Tru, will be hosting a Har-Tru Maintenance Certification Seminar August 12th and 13th, 2010. The purpose of the seminar is to bring together leading experts on indoor and outdoor clay courts to discuss the construction and maintenance of clay. In addition to construction and maintenance techniques, the seminar will include information on the causes of indoor and bubbled court surface compaction and what techniques are being used to alleviate it.

Information will be communicated through classroom presentations, panel discussions and on court demonstrations. The event will be held at The John McEnroe Tennis Academy, Sportime at Randall’s Island, One Randall’s Island, New York, NY 10035. The seminar is designed for anyone managing, maintaining or considering installing clay tennis courts including Club Managers, Teaching Professionals, Court Builders and Maintenance Professionals.

Lee Tennis is the manufacturer of Har-Tru. For more information contact Ed Montecalvo at 1-877-4HARTRU or emontecalvo@leetennis.com.


Everlast with Nike Grind Supports United Disabilities Services

Everlast sports surfacing with Nike Grind is proud to partner with United Disabilities Services (UDS) in their efforts to provide service dogs to assist the community’s disabled. United Disabilities Services has introduced a new training center for two of their Labrador retriever pups, preparing them to partner with two individuals as service dogs when they have mastered the necessary skills. The dogs will learn how to complete an extensive array of daily human tasks, ranging from opening and closing doors to turning off lights and retrieving from the refrigerator.

Before USD’s new center was introduced, training was completed at a local animal hospital or in the trainer’s homes. The new facility, located in Greenfield Industrial Park on Homestead Lane in Lancaster, PA, will provide a central location specifically equipped with the necessary amenities to facilitate swift and precise training. Everlast sports surfacing with Nike Grind contributed to the facility by donating 1,400 square feet of recycled rubber surfacing. The 6mm material contained twenty percent green color and provides a durable and easily cleaned surface for the puppies’ daily training activities.

“We are proud to be able to donate to United Disabilities Services and help them grow the quality and capabilities of their organization,” states Rich Campbell, EVP of sales and marketing, ECORE International. “ECORE has always maintained a commitment to improving the health of our environment and the safety and advancement of our community.”

Everlast with Nike Grind products support low VOC emissions and are PVC free. They are comprised of post-consumer tire rubber, pre and post-consumer Nike Grind rubber, ColorMill EPDM, and proprietary binders. This combination of low VOC emissions and high recycled content allows Everlast with Nike Grind to potentially contribute toward earning up to 8 points toward LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification. Everlast has also expanded its recycling and sustainability efforts by partnering with Nike to include Nike Grind Rubber in all of its fitness surfacing products. Nike Grind rubber is made from sports footwear manufacturing by-products and post-consumer athletic shoes collected through the Nike Reuse-A-Shoe program. By implementing Nike Grind material into its products, Everlast will rescue nearly 300,000 pounds of unwanted athletic shoes from landfills each year.

For more information on United Disabilities Services visit:
http://www.udservices.org/default.asp

For more information on Everlast sports surfacing with Nike Grind visit:
http://www.everlastsportssurfacing.com

DecoTurf Surface Chosen for the Atlanta Tennis Championships

The organizers of the Atlanta Tennis Championships have chosen DecoColor, from the makers of DecoTurf, as the Official Surface of their world-class tennis tournament. The Atlanta Tennis Championships will take place July 17-25 at the Atlanta Athletic Club, in Johns Creek, Georgia as part of the prestigious Olympus US Open Series. The ATP World Tour returns to Georgia for the first time in 9 years when Atlanta last staged an ATP World Tour event from 1992-2001 that was played on green clay.

“In welcoming the Olympus US Open Series to Atlanta, we wanted to provide the best setting for an exciting and competitive tournament,” said Tournament Director Bill Oakes “and we are confident that the professionals at DecoTurf, with their extensive experience with championship events, will help us accomplish that.”

“DecoTurf is excited to have once again been chosen as the surface for an Olympus US Open Series tournament," said John Graham, DecoTurf's Managing Director “and we are pleased to be working with Signature Tennis of Woodstock, Georgia.” Signature Tennis is a full-service tennis court construction firm that builds and services courts throughout Georgia, and brings extensive experience and pride to every job.

Editor’s Note: Information contained in Memberline is submitted by members and is published without verification. Its publication does not constitute an endorsement.

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May We Quote You?

One of ASBA's most important programs is its technical articles, which are written for trade magazines in various segments of the industry, including tennis, track, indoor and fields facilities. We are always looking for our members to comment on, and be quoted in these articles. This is an excellent chance to help raise ASBA's profile, and in an ancillary capacity, to increase visibility for your company. If you would like to be quoted in these articles, please send an e-mail to Mary Helen Sprecher at mhsprecher@verizon.net.

Please indicate your area(s) of expertise: Tennis, Track, Indoor, Fields so that we do not bother you with excess e-mail. You can be added to more than one mailing list if you wish.

If you have previously sent Mary Helen an e-mail asking to be added to her e-mail list, please confirm now that you would like to remain on the list. In addition, if your e-mail has changed and you have not been receiving questions, please contact her with your current e-mail address.

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Calendar of Events

For information on any of the meetings shown below, call ASBA at 866-501-ASBA, e-mail info@sportsbuilders.org or visit ASBA's web site.

2010

December 4, 2010
Certification Exams (CTCB, CTB, CFB)
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL.

December 4-7, 2010
ASBA Technical Meeting
Marriott Sawgrass
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL

2011
January 15, 2011
Certified Field Builders (CFB) Exam
STMA Conference and Exhibition, Austin, TX
STMA requires that each test-taker purchase at a minimum, a one day education and trade show registration. For the STMA registration form, go to www.STMA.org. CFB candidates should contact ASBA for application materials at www.sportsbuilders.org

February 10-15, 2011
ASBA Winter Meeting
Atlantis Paradise Island
Nassau, Bahamas

June 21, 2011
ASBA Awards Deadline

December 1-6, 2011
ASBA Technical Meeting
JW Marriott Resort and Spa Palm Springs, CA.

Information on the ASBA Technical Meetings and Winter Meetings will be sent out automatically to all ASBA members. Non-members should request information by contacting ASBA.

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Copyright American Sports Builders Association 2014
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Phone: 866-501-ASBA (2722)  –  410-730-9595
Fax: 410-730-8833
Email: info@sportsbuilders.org